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Calling all 13- to 26-year-old Philharmonic fans: don't forget that you can get a FREE ticket to many of our Friday subscription concerts! Reserve your ticket through our online reservation portal, which opens at noon on the Monday before each Philharmonic Free Friday concert. We recommend registering as soon as the portal opens -- tickets tend to be claimed within minutes!

This Monday, January 15, at noon, reserve your ticket for our next Free Friday, January 19 at 8:00 p.m., featuring Ravel's Boléro, Debussy, pianist Jean-Yves Thibaudet, and more.

Major support for Philharmonic Free Fridays is provided by an Anonymous Donor. Additional funding is provided by Muna and Basem Hishmeh.

(Photo: Jennifer Taylor)

5 days ago |
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"[Being part of a symphonic work is] almost like reading a wonderful book or seeing a great movie. Every little thing plays into the final product." -- Liang Wang

The first of those "little" things is the first oboe's piercing A to which the whole orchestra tunes. At the New York Philharmonic this comes from Principal Oboe Liang Wang. In the Q & A video above, Liang discusses some of the possible reasons why the first oboe traditionally performs this duty.

Liang also shares insights about reed-making and its similarities to wine-making, and how his performance depends on homemade reeds that, at the tip, can be thinner than a strand of hair. The beginning of the video features the technically demanding yet seductive solo that Liang will play this month in Ravel's Le Tombeau de Couperin.

Throughout January you'll see Liang on the cover of Playbill and featured on the Philharmonic's social media channels.

Follow us on FacebookTwitterInstagramSnapchat, and Tumblr for more!

In February On the Cover will feature violist Rémi Pelletier.

Learn more about Liang Wang

12 days ago |
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The new year is kicking off busily for New York Philharmonic Kravis Emerging Composer Anna Thorvaldsdottir. Fresh on the heels of having a piece on one of NPR Music's Top 10 Classical Albums of 2017, her will be performed by Philharmonic musicians at Monday's CONTACT! concert at National Sawdust, alongside works by Sarah Kirkland Snider, Ashley Fure, Du Yun, and Fernanda Aoki Navarro.

After this amuse-bouche, don't miss the main course on April 4--6: the World Premiere of Metacosmos, Thorvaldsdottir's Philharmonic orchestral commission, conducted by Composer-in-Residence Esa-Pekka Salonen.

The composer writes:

Metacosmos is constructed around the natural balance between beauty and chaos -- how elements can come together in (seemingly) utter chaos to create a unified, structured whole. The idea and inspiration behind the piece is the speculative metaphor of falling into a black hole -- the unknown -- with endless constellations and layers of opposing forces connecting and communicating with each other, expanding and contracting, projecting a struggle for power as the different sources pull on you and you realize that you are being drawn into a force that is beyond your control." 

Ditto!

12 days ago |
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If you won't be with us for New Year's Eve: Bernstein on Broadway, our sold-out tribute to former Music Director Leonard Bernstein, you're in luck: it will be telecast on Live From Lincoln Center at 9:00 PM on December 31 on PBS! Check your local listings to confirm the time in your area. [Watch the archived video here or above.]

Toast the New Year and Lenny's 100th with West Side Story's star-crossed lovers, On the Town's fun-loving sailors, and Wonderful Town's bright-eyed New Yorkers as portrayed by Tony winner Annaleigh Ashford, Hamilton's Christopher Jackson, Cinderella's Laura Osnes, and Next to Normal's Aaron Tveit. Our old friend Bramwell Tovey conducts, Lonny Price provides staging and continuity, and Westminster Festival Chorus rounds out the stellar line-up.

The concert continues the Philharmonic's season-long celebrations of its Laureate Conductor's 100th birthday year. On February 22--24, Assistant Conductor Joshua Gersen will lead Bernstein's Symphonic Dances from West Side Story, which the Philharmonic premiered in 1961. And "Bernstein's Mahler Marathon: The Sony Recordings," 13 hours of his performances of his Philharmonic predecessor's complete symphonies on Sunday, will take place at Lincoln Center's David Rubenstein Atrium on February 25.

21 days ago |
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Looking for the perfect gift to give the music lover in your life? We have something for everyone this season: T-shirts, tickets, even naming a phrase in Beethoven's Fifth Symphony.

1 month ago |
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It's official: December 7 -- the New York Philharmonic's 175th birthday -- was declared "New York Philharmonic Day" in a Mayoral Proclamation presented by Kai Falkenberg, First Deputy Commissioner of the Mayor's Office of Media & Entertainment, from the stage during last night's 175th birthday concert.

Also announced last night: the Philharmonic, in partnership with the Mayor's Office of Media & Entertainment, will give away 175 free tickets to underserved communities in honor of 175 years as New York's orchestra.

Happy birthday to us! Thank you, Mayor de Blasio, Commissioner Julie Menin, and the Mayor's Office of Media & Entertainment. Here's to meaningful connections between the New York Philharmonic and our fellow New Yorkers for the next 175-plus years. We ♥ NY!

(Photo: Chris Lee)

1 month ago |
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"To this day, when I tour with the Philharmonic I always treat it as this big privilege." -- Yulia Ziskel

The passports of New York Philharmonic musicians are littered with stamps from around the world. That's especially true for Philharmonic violinist Yulia Ziskel.

When Yulia was a young girl living in the Soviet Union, she performed solo works across the globe. Her violin eventually took her to the United States, where she made her way to the New York Philharmonic.

In December you can find Yulia on the cover of Playbill and featured on the Philharmonic's social media channels. Follow us on FacebookTwitterInstagramSnapchat, and Tumblr for more!

In the new year On the Cover will feature Principal Oboe Liang Wang.

Learn more about Yulia Ziskel

1 month ago |
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"It was excellent timing on someone's part: the New York Philharmonic's, the University of Louisville's, or both."

So begins the rave review, by James R. Oestreich, of last night's concert in The New York Times.

He was referring to the World Premiere of Bent Sørensen's Evening Land happening the same week that Sørensen received the University's Grawemeyer Prize for Music Composition, one of the most important in the field.

The piece, which was commissioned by the Philharmonic through the generous support of The Marie-Josée Kravis Prize for New Music, is inspired by, in Sørensen's words, "a very special evening light over the fields" from his childhood in Denmark, and "the new vision of flashes of light and bustling activity" that he saw in New York many years later.

Oestreich wrote: 

The concertmaster -- here, Sheryl Staples (in the absence of Frank Huang) -- emerges from silence almost imperceptibly and in all innocence with a fetching little tune. The principal violist, Cynthia Phelps, eventually joins her, and they whisper across the podium until the other strings join in and overwhelm them.
The ending, after the fray, is truly touching. The principal oboist, Liang Wang, plays the work's longest strain, Mr. Sorensen's tribute to his father-in-law, an oboist who died in May before he could hear the work. Mr. Wang lingers on a high note, handing it off to Ms. Staples, who leads the strings on tiptoes back to silence.

The concert, conducted by Edo de Waart, also featured Mozart's Piano Concerto No. 20 with Emanuel Ax (who "offered his usual elegant, understated virtuosity," Oestreich said) and Brahms's Symphony No. 2. It will be repeated tonight and Saturday night.

(Photo: Chris Lee)

1 month ago |
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Bent Sørensen has won the 2018 Grawemeyer Award for Music Composition, and this week New York audiences can discover why.

On November 30--December 2 the New York Philharmonic gives the World Premiere of his Evening Land, a work commissioned by the Orchestra through the generous support of The Marie-Josée Kravis Prize for New Music.

The Graweveyer Award -- which is also awarded in political science, psychology, education, and religion -- is given annually "to help make the world a better place. ... Music has the ability to inspire, to bring joy to those who hear it and those who create it. It can convey great emotion in just a few powerful notes. There is, perhaps, no greater expression of the human spirit. For this reason, the Grawemeyer Award in Music Composition honors those who bring beauty and inspiration into the world." The work so honored is L'Isola della Citta, Sørensen's 2015 concerto for violin, cello, and piano. 

Of Evening Land the Danish composer said:

"A picture, a vision: I am six or seven years old. I am standing in my childhood home in a small town on the island of Zealand in Denmark. I am looking out of the window, and there is a very special evening light over the fields. ... It is as if the world is infinite. ... The vision returned many years later, as I was looking out over New York from a high balcony. The vision from more than 50 years ago -- the vision of quiet -- was mixed with the new vision of flashes of light and bustling activity. Those two visions led me to the title Evening Land and the music came out of that title."

Congratulations, and we look forward to the concerts!

(Photo: Lars Skaaning)

1 month ago |
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The New York Philharmonic went west this weekend -- to Ann Arbor for its second residency with the University Musical Society (UMS) of the University of Michigan (U-M) in conjunction with the U-M School of Music, Theatre & Dance. Music Director Designate Jaap van Zweden led Mahler; Leonard Slatkin led Bernstein featuring Oscar-winning actor Jeremy Irons; U-M students got the chance to perform with Philharmonic musicians; the Philharmonic presented lectures and master classes; and all saluted composer-conductor-former Music Director Leonard Bernstein in his centennial year.

1 month ago |
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