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In this video, violinist Anne-Sophie Mutter talks about the importance of contemporary music, and also touches on some of the contemporary pieces she will be performing this season.

Learn more about Anne-Sophie Mutter's Perspectives series.


 



Mutter
Anne-Sophie Mutter
Tuesday, April 28 at 8 PM
New World Symphony
    
An eclectic program that spans Biedermeier Vienna to 20th century Switzerland is performed by Anne-Sophie Mutter, “the undisputed queen of violin playing” (The Times, London), with Michael Tilson Thomas conducting the New World Symphony. Mutter is featured in two 20th-century works: Berg’s profoundly moving Violin Concerto and Moret’s rapturous En rêve, a work written for her in 1988. Schubert’s warmly melodic Incidental Music from Rosamunde opens the concert that climaxes with the shimmering orchestral colors of Debussy’s La mer.

3 months ago | |
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If you missed the breathtaking live broadcast of Carnegie Hall's Opening Night Gala on Wednesday, you can now listen to it in its entirety.

Sir Simon Rattle led the Berliner Philharmoniker through a program that included Rachmaninoff's Symphonic Dances, Bruch's Violin Concerto No. 1 with soloist Anne-Sophie Mutter, and the dramatic closing scenes from Stravinsky's The Firebird. Read the program notes here. You may also follow along with the transcript of the live chat below while you listen.

This concert is part of our Carnegie Hall Live series, a partnership with WQXR and the WFMT Radio Network. Join us on Friday, November 7 at 7:30 PM for the next Carnegie Hall Live broadcast of the Academy of Ancient Music in an all-Bach program.

   
3 months ago | |
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South African vocalist Nicky Schrire gives us her personal journey in the South African jazz landscape.

Join Nicky at Jazz at Lincoln Center from October 15–16, where she and saxophonist TK Blue lead a collaborative ensemble of American and South African artists called Kuumba Collective. Nicky will also lead a listening party on Monday, October 13, where she will be sharing some of her favorite and most influential records.


I was born to South African parents in London and we moved to Cape Town in 1991, shortly after Mandela’s release from Robben Island. Growing up in South Africa, I was exposed to largely European and American musical gems. My father made sure that there was no shortage of James Taylor; Blood, Sweat & Tears; or Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young in our house. And my mother balanced out our sonic landscape with Mozart sonatas, Rachmaninoff concertos, and the magical world of musical theater (Lerner and Loewe, Rodgers and Hammerstein, and the genius of Cole Porter).

Nicky Schrire 275px

When I was 11, I started learning the tenor saxophone. Through this golden, brassy instrument, I was introduced to the world of jazz. Although my initial encounter with the genre was with the music of Count Basie, Glenn Miller, and the American jazz tradition, I quickly became aware that my musical peers had different jazz role models to mine. Early on in my jazz schooling, big band scores by Bob Mintzer were interspersed with arrangements of Abdullah Ibrahim’s Mannenberg. I leapt at the challenge of learning intricate, bebop shout choruses, but when the band started playing that slow shuffling groove of Winston Mankunku Ngozi’s “Crossroads Crossroads,” my soul reverberated with a deep contentedness.

I enrolled in the University of Cape Town’s jazz program at the South African College of Music, happily willing to submerge myself further in the American jazz tradition. I became familiar with Charlie Parker’s Omnibook, played big-band arrangements by Bob Brookmeyer, and sung Sarah Vaughan’s “Shulie A Bop.” All the while, many of my peers wondered how this American, academically focused approach and music tied into their musical traditions. I wasn’t perplexed by the absence of South African jazz in our curriculum because, unlike my peers, I didn’t grow up exposed to the sounds of Kippie Moeketsi or Jonas Gwangwa. You can’t miss what you don’t know.

Nicky Schrire 960px


“As I developed a deeper love for the improvisatory nature of jazz, the provenance of the music started mattering less and less.”


As I developed a deeper love for the improvisatory nature of jazz, the provenance of the music started mattering less and less. I had a solid musical foundation and I was now free to explore other genres and to start the process of discovering what kind of music I wanted to be making away from the confines of academia. I became more interested in the musical backgrounds and interests of my peers. I was invited to sing in a tribute concert to the late, great pianist Bheki Mseleku that friends of mine were organizing at our college. This was my first encounter both with Bheki’s music and the original music that my friends were writing—South African jazz for our generation.

What followed was a heightened awareness of the South African jazz lexicon. It suddenly seemed like every South African jazz singer was singing Allan Mzamo Silinga’s “Ntyilo Ntyilo,” made famous by Miriam Makeba, and horn players were paying homage to Winston Mankunku Ngozi. Reluctant to follow trends, I started looking for slightly more obscure songs that weren’t the “Autumn Leaves” of South African jazz. I was immediately entranced by Busi Mhlongo’s music—the vibrancy and intricacy of her “Urban Zulu” world was magnificent. All these traits I associated with the “sound of South Africa” were overflowing in her music. The grooves, the guitar sounds, the languages, the spirit of the music. I love the simplicity of South African jazz, but the chromaticism of my traditional jazz schooling has stayed with me and my ears yearn for a “crunch” or a surprising harmonic shift. Busi’s music follows both traditional South African harmonies, while being sophisticated and unorthodox at times.

While I was fortunate to perform in Abdullah Ibrahim’s inaugural Cape Town Jazz Orchestra and to play South African repertoire in the UCT Big Band, it wasn’t either of these experiences that really made me assess and develop my connection to South African jazz. I was hired to perform in the horn section for Sibongile Khumalo’s tribute show to Soweto-born jazz singer Letta Mbulu. Everything about the experience—from Ma Sibongile’s rapid-fire Zulu exchanges with pianist Themba Mkhize, to listening to Letta’s recordings in order to learn my parts by ear, to witnessing audiences at the Grahamstown National Arts Festival cheer and react to a music that really spoke to them—was an education. The musical content, much of it written by Letta’s composer-arranger husband Caiphus Semenya, really opened my ears to the complexity and variety that could be found in a lot of South African jazz, as it was in Busi’s music. It became important for me to find my “voice” within South African jazz even though there were pre-conceived notions about what I was expected to sing.

After being exposed to Letta and Caiphus’s music, I continued to seek out South African jazz repertoire, artists, and composers that weren’t commonly interpreted. It became exceedingly important to me because many international audiences were only aware of Abdullah Ibrahim and Hugh Masekela as leading South African jazz figures (which they are). I love Abdullah’s music and am ever so thankful for Bra Hugh’s significance and body of work, but as I see more and more people expressing interest in the South African jazz scene, I long for them to discover artists like Busi, Letta, and the composers of my generation (Kyle Shepherd, Marcus Wyatt, Shane Cooper, and others).

Although I have been lucky to live in other countries, I grew up in South Africa and that’s the place I call home. Being invited to perform as part of Carnegie Hall’s UBUNTU festival means the world to me because I have a deep connection to the music of my country, even if I’ve come to discover it in a roundabout way. I’m thrilled to be part of this festival alongside my South African musical peers (Kesivan Naidoo, Kyle Shepherd, Shane Cooper), and I can’t wait to share some of my favorite South African songs—both by icons like Victor Ntoni and by peers like Mark Fransman—with New York audiences.

—Nicky Schrire



Nicky Schrire
Nicky Schrire
Monday, October 13 at 7 PM
Listening Party: Nicky Schrire

Jazz at Lincoln Center's education department hosts a listening party that features South African vocalist Nicky Schrire sharing some of her favorite and most influential records.

Irene Diamond Education Center
Jazz at Lincoln Center
Broadway at 60th Street | Manhattan
jalc.org | 212-258-9800

 
J@LC
October 15–16
Kuumba Collective

The Kuumba Collective, a collaborative ensemble of American and South African artists led by saxophonist TK Blue and vocalist Nicky Schrire, presents the South African Songbook: SA to USA, featuring classic repertoire of South African jazz as well as original works.

Wednesday, October 15 | 7:30 PM
Wednesday, October 15 | 9:30 PM
Thursday, October 16 | 7:30 PM
Thursday, October 16 | 9:30 PM

Dizzy’s Club Coca-Cola
Jazz at Lincoln Center
Broadway at 60th Street | Manhattan
jalc.org/dizzys | 212-258-9800

3 months ago | |
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Singer-songwriter, guitarist, and composer David Kramer explains the unique Cape Town tradition of Cape Malay Choirs.

Learn more about UBUNTU: Music and Arts of South Africa festival and upcoming concerts.


 



David Kramer
David Kramer
Saturday, October 25 at 9 PM
David Kramer Band
Young Cape Malay Stars


The fascinating folk music from the Cape region of South Africa is explored by two groups in this concert. Composer, guitarist, singer-songwriter, and tireless champion of Cape musical traditions, David Kramer performs with a lineup of top musicians from Cape Town and the Karoo desert. New York audiences also have a rare opportunity to hear a Cape Malay choir—the Young Cape Malay Stars, a 15-voice male choir led by Moeniel Jacobs. They perform music from Cape Town that combines Dutch folk songs and Afrikaans comic songs with colorful inflections and ornaments from vocal traditions as far afield as Malaysia, Arabia, and East Africa.

3 months ago | |
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Violinist Anne-Sophie Mutter discusses the importance of chamber music, as well as her upcoming chamber concert with pianist Yefim Bronfman and cellist Lynn Harrell.

Learn more about Anne-Sophie Mutter's Perspectives series.


 



Elza van den Heever
Anne-Sophie Mutter
Tuesday, April 14 at 8 PM
The Mutter-Bronfman-Harrell Trio
    
Beethoven’s “Archduke” Trio was named for his patron Rudolf of Austria. The large-scale and seamless integration of the three instruments was unprecedented and set the tone for the great trios of Schubert, Brahms, Dvorák, and others. Tchaikovsky’s Trio in A Minor was dedicated to his mentor Nikolai Rubinstein, the founder of the Moscow Conservatory. With its opening “Pezzo elegiaco” (“Elegiac Piece”) and brilliant set of variations on a folk theme, Tchaikovsky’s Trio is an impassioned masterpiece.

3 months ago | |
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A new partnership between Carnegie Hall and medici.tv will make live webcasts of four Carnegie Hall concert presentations this November and December available to audiences for the first time, showcasing performances by some of the world’s most celebrated artists.

This series of webcasts from Stern Auditorium / Perelman Stage begins on Tuesday, November 4 at 8 PM with a recital by mezzo-soprano Joyce DiDonato and pianist David Zobel. One of the most beloved singers of her generation, Ms. DiDonato will perform a program of Venetian and Venetian-themed songs and arias from the Baroque through the 20th century. The lineup continues on Tuesday, November 18 at 8 PM with acclaimed violinist Anne-Sophie Mutter leading the Mutter Virtuosi in a program that includes the US premiere of André Previn’s Violin Concerto No. 2 as well as Vivaldi’s The Four Seasons. On Saturday, November 22 at 8 PM, the dream-team of violinist Leonidas Kavakos and pianist Yuja Wang perform music by Brahms, Schumann, Stravinsky, and Respghi. The series of webcasts culminates on Tuesday, December 9 at 8 PM with young Russian piano virtuoso Daniil Trifonov in works by Bach (arranged by Liszt), Beethoven, and Liszt.

“Throughout its history, Carnegie Hall has been a place that has connected leading artists with passionate audiences seeking the very best in music,” said Clive Gillinson, executive and artistic director of Carnegie Hall. “We’re thrilled, through this new partnership with medici.tv, to be able to extend the reach of these extraordinary performances, sharing the magic of music-making at Carnegie Hall with an ever-growing circle of music lovers around the world.”

Following each live webcast, free replay of these concerts will be available to online audiences on medici.tv for another 90 days, playable worldwide on all internet-enabled devices.

Since its official launch in 2008, medici.tv has gained international recognition, bringing together a community of 200,000 music and arts lovers from 180 countries. In addition to webcasts of more than 100 live events each year, medici.tv has partnered with the world’s top artists and music institutions to offer subscriptions that give music lovers the opportunity to watch more than 1,400 video-on-demand programs.

Upcoming Webcasts

Joyce DiDonato and David Zobel | November 4 at 8 PM (ET)
Anne-Sophie Mutter and the Mutter Virtuosi | November 18 at 8 PM (ET)
Leonidas Kavakos and Yuja Wang | November 22 at 8 PM (ET)
Daniil Trifonov | December 9 at 8 PM (ET)

3 months ago | |
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A new partnership between Carnegie Hall and medici.tv will make live webcasts of Carnegie Hall concert presentations available to audiences for the first time, showcasing performances by some of the world’s most celebrated artists.


A series of four free webcasts via medici.tv from Carnegie Hall’s Stern Auditorium/Perelman Stage begins on Tuesday, November 4 at 8 PM (EST) with a recital by mezzo-soprano Joyce DiDonato and pianist David Zobel. DiDonato—one of the most beloved singers of her generation—will perform a program of Venetian and Venetian-themed songs and arias from the Baroque through the 20th century. The lineup continues on Tuesday, November 18 at 8 PM with acclaimed violinist Anne-Sophie Mutter leading The Mutter Virtuosi, in a program that includes the U.S. premiere of André Previn’s Violin Concerto No. 2 as well as Vivaldi’s The Four Seasons. On Saturday, November 22 at 8 PM, the dream team of violinist Leonidas Kavakos and pianist Yuja Wang perform music by Schumann, Brahms, Respighi, and Stravinsky. The series of webcasts culminates on Tuesday, December 9 at 8 PM with young Russian piano virtuoso Daniil Trifonov in works by Bach (arranged by Liszt), Beethoven, and Liszt.

Following each live webcast, free replay of these concerts will be available to online audiences on medici.tv for another 90 days, playable worldwide on all internet-enabled devices, including smart phones, tablets, Chromecast, computers and smart TVs.

Upcoming Webcasts

Joyce DiDonato and David Zobel | November 4 at 8 PM (EST)
Anne-Sophie Mutter and The Mutter Virtuosi | November 18 at 8 PM (EST)
Leonidas Kavakos and Yuja Wang | November 22 at 8 PM (EST)
Daniil Trifonov | December 9 at 8 PM (EST)


About medici.tv

Since its official launch in May 2008, medici.tv has gained international recognition, bringing together a community of 200,000 music and arts lovers from 180 countries. In addition to offering live concert hall events that music lovers can experience on their computers and entertainment systems (Chromecast, Airplay, Smart TVs), medici.tv offers a free application (available at the Apple App Store and at Google Play for Android) that makes it possible to experience world-class artistry on all mobile devices. In addition, more than 80 client universities around the world take advantage of medici.tv, including Stanford University, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Columbia University, Juilliard School and Manhattan School of Music. New partnerships includes the distribution of a selection of medici.tv content through major digital platforms including iTunes, Samsung, Amazon, Canal +, GVT in Brazil, and Shanghai Media Group, confirming medici.tv’s role as the leading digital provider and aggregator of audiovisual classical music programs worldwide.

In addition to webcasts of more than 100 live events each year, medici.tv has partnered with the world’s top artists and music institutions to offer subscriptions that give music lovers the opportunity to watch more than 1,400 video-on-demand programs. They include concerts, operas, recitals, documentaries, masterclasses, artist portraits and archival material by such legendary musicians as Maria Callas, Glenn Gould, Yehudi Menuhin, David Oistrakh, Sviatoslav Richter, Mstislav Rostropovich, Arthur Rubinstein, Georg Solti and Dietrich Fischer-Dieskau.

3 months ago | |
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In this video, singer Angélique Kidjo discusses her childhood and writing politically engaged music.

WithUBUNTU: Music and Arts of South Africa festival less than two weeks away, we will continue to post videos that explore the many threads that make up South Africa's vibrant culture.


 



Elza van den Heever
Angélique Kidjo
Wednesday, November 5 at 8 PM
Angélique Kidjo and Friends
    MAMA AFRICA: A TRIBUTE TO MIRIAM MAKEBA
Grammy Award–winning vocalist Angélique Kidjo celebrates the life and music of iconic South African singer and political activist Miriam Makeba, known popularly as “Mama Africa.” Kidjo shared a close relationship with Makeba, studying with her and eventually performing with her in Paris and South Africa. Kidjo returns to Carnegie Hall—with Makeba’s supporting singers Zamokuhle "Zamo" Mbutho, Faith Kekana, and Stella Khumalo—in this tribute to a remarkable woman.

4 months ago | |
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In this video, artist William Kentridge discusses his Paper Music project that will take place in Zankel Hall on October 27. Paper Music features a selection of 10 Kentridge films with music by South African compatriot Philip Miller.

WithUBUNTU: Music and Arts of South Africa festival less than two weeks away, we will continue to post videos that explore the many threads that make up South Africa's vibrant culture.


 



Kentridge
Philip Miller | William Kentridge
Monday, October 27 at 7:30 PM
Paper Music: A Ciné Concert by Philip Miller and William Kentridge

This is the latest project in an ongoing collaboration between the Johannesburg-born visual artist William Kentridge and his South African compatriot Philip Miller. Their artistic partnership dates back to Kentridge’s 1993 film Felix in Exile, part of his celebrated Soho Eckstein series for which Miller wrote the score. Paper Music features a selection of films by Kentridge with music by Miller, including three that were presented at the dOCUMENTA (13) exhibition as part of The Refusal of Time installation.

4 months ago | |
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South African singer-songwriter, guitarist, and composer David Kramer looks back at the Apartheid era when much of his music was banned for politcal satire and the mixing of languages.

WithUBUNTU: Music and Arts of South Africa festival less than two weeks away, we will continue to post videos that explore the many threads that make up South Africa's vibrant culture.


 



David Kramer
Abdullah Ibrahim
Sunday, October 25 at 9 PM
David Kramer Band
Young Stars: Traditional Cape Malay Singers


The fascinating folk music from the Cape region of South Africa is explored by two groups in this concert. Composer, guitarist, singer-songwriter, and tireless champion of Cape musical traditions, David Kramer performs with a lineup of top musicians from Cape Town and the Karoo desert. New York audiences also have a rare opportunity to hear a Cape Malay choir—the Young Stars: Traditional Cape Malay Singers, a 15-voice male choir led by Moeniel Jacobs. They perform music from Cape Town that combines Dutch folk songs and Afrikaans comic songs with colorful inflections and ornaments from vocal traditions as far afield as Malaysia, Arabia, and East Africa.

4 months ago | |
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