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Clarke Bustard
The Virginia Classical Music Blog
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Steven Smith conducting
with Joshua Bell, violin
Sept. 20, Richmond CenterStage

If Joshua Bell has kept count of the number of times he has played Max Bruch’s Violin Concerto No. 1 in G minor, he hasn’t shared the tally. A lot, for sure – enough for the Bruch to be widely known as his signature concert piece.

Bell played it again with Steven Smith and the Richmond Symphony to open the orchestra’s 2014-15 season. The violinist played with evident affection for this music, and with a seeming inclination toward what musicians of the 18th century called affectus – a calculated projection of mood and emotion.

From the first long, low note on the fiddle to the brilliant conclusion, Bell’s performance was highly expressive. Hardly a phrase went by without some touch-up, usually but not always rendered subtly. His signature tone, combining richness and brilliance, was present in abundance, especially in the central adagio of the concerto. His instrument, a 1713 Stradivarius formerly owned by Bronislaw Huberman, is one of the finest violins in existence, and its owner knows how to get the most out of it.

Bell nowadays is both a solo violinist and conductor, in his third year as music director of Britain’s Academy of St. Martin in the Fields; so it was interesting to see how he interacted with the orchestra in this performance. Attentively – he often faced the accompanying musicians when he wasn’t playing – but without any overt moves toward directing them. Their conductor, Steven Smith, had the performance well in hand, and shared Bell’s emphasis on expressivity.

Smith anticipated it, in fact, in the music that preceded Bell’s appearance, “Vltava” (“The Moldau”), the best-known piece from Bedrich Smetana’s symphonic cycle “Ma Vlast” (“My Fatherland”) and perhaps the most evocative “water music” of the romantic era. Smith and the symphony’s strings and winds expertly navigated Smetana’s swells and eddies, with the orchestra’s French horns adding richly atmospheric touches.

The concert, which drew a capacity crowd, concluded with two popular orchestral showpieces by Ottorino Respighi, “The Fountains of Rome” and “The Pines of Rome.” Respighi is one of the figures without whom the Hollywood film score as we know it simply wouldn’t exist; many of the splashier coloristic effects of film music are inherited directly from these two pieces.

Smith and the symphony splashed spectacularly – the raucous “Triton Fountain at Morn” and the militant conclusion of “The Pines of the Appian Way” were some of the loudest performances the orchestra has delivered in years; but they also handled atmospherics and representational touches with sensitivity as well as vividness.

The brass players and percussionists audibly relished their showcases, playing with great sonority as well as impact. Wind players, including flutist Mary Boodell, clarinetist Jared Davis and oboist Shawn Welk, contributed excellent solos, as did trumpeter Rolla Durham in an offstage passage.

Stationing trumpeters and trombonists at three points in the balcony enhanced the room-filling sound of the "Appian Way" finale.
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Sept. 18
noon-2 p.m. EDT
1600-1800 UTC
1700-1900 GMT
WDCE, University of Richmond
90.1 FM
www.wdce.org

Sarasate: “Serenata andaluza”
Julia Fischer, violin; Milana Chernyavska, piano (Decca)

Suk: Serenade for strings
Appassionata/Daniel Myssyk (Fidelio)

Beethoven: Sonata in C minor, Op. 10, No. 1
Ronald Brautigam, fortepiano (Bis)

Debussy: Sonata for flute, viola and harp
Philippe Bernold, flute; Gérard Caussé, viola; Isabelle Moretti, harp
(Harmonia Mundi France)

Mozart: Piano Concerto No. 15 in B flat major,
K. 450
Pierre-Laurent Aimard, piano & director
Chamber Orchestra of Europe (Warner Classics)

Past Masters:
Richard Strauss: “Till Eulenspiegel’s Merry Pranks”
Cleveland Orchestra/George Szell (Sony Classical)
(recorded 1957)
4 months ago | |
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The Atlanta Journal-Constitution’s Howard Pousner gets to the nub of the dispute between management and musicians in the Atlanta Symphony lockout: Whether an ensemble smaller than the current complement of 88 – down from 95 in the 2011-12 season – crosses a threshold that “must not be crossed” if a “full, robust and world-class symphony orchestra” is to be maintained, as the orchestra’s chief conductors, Robert Spano and Donald Runnicles, wrote in a letter to management before the Sept. 7 lockout:

http://artsculture.blog.ajc.com/2014/09/13/orchestras-size-resonates-as-big-issue-in-atlanta-symphony-dispute/

The Atlanta Symphony has been running in the red for 12 consecutive seasons. If the orchestra cannot increase its revenue through fund-raising and ticket sales – not impossible: a $37 million budget is not excessive in a metro area of 5.5 million people (the Baltimore Symphony maintains a $27 million budget in a metro area with half the population of Atlanta’s) – then, clearly, something has to give.

Size matters in a lot of symphonic music, especially in Mahler, Richard Strauss, the big Stravinsky ballet scores and other late-romantic and early modern repertory. It is possible to give credible performances of such works with reduced strings – when orchestras shrink, most of the shrinkage is absorbed by string sections – but rarely possible to achieve great performances.

I’ve heard the Richmond Symphony and Virginia Symphony play big opuses of Mahler, Bruckner, Sibelius and Nielsen with understrength string sections. They were readings of high intensity and deep musicality, but with unavoidable imbalances between strings and winds and a marked loss of sonic punch, especially when performed in full-size concert halls.

Ensemble cohesion matters as much as size. I’ve heard many orchestral performances in which substantial numbers of free-lance substitutes filled out string and wind sections. Better balances and more punch inevitably were offset by less refinement, expressivity and stylistic fluency.

If the plan in Atlanta is to shrink to a fulltime “core” needing the addition of several dozen substitutes to play large-scale works, then the conductors and locked-out musicians are correct in anticipating that the Atlanta Symphony would be an entirely different orchestra. From week to week, even.

Would it remain a “world-class” orchestra? Doubtful, even if one were to grant that it has been a top-tier ensemble. (Not many critics would rate it that highly.)

With intelligent artistic guidance, a downsized Atlanta Symphony might be remade into a estimable classical-scale orchestra, comparable to such ensembles as the Academy of St. Martin in the Fields or the Chamber Orchestra of Europe, capable of playing first-rate Mozart, Beethoven, Mendelssohn, Schumann, even Brahms and Dvorák, and of accompanying most of the standard concerto repertory and the great Atlanta Symphony Chorus that Robert Shaw built.

Would such an orchestra project properly in the Woodruff Arts Center’s 1,762-seat Atlanta Symphony Hall? Or would it need to move to a smaller venue? Since the orchestra currently operates as part of the Woodruff Center, a move presumably would entail a new corporate arrangement. Assuming that could be managed, would playing in a smaller hall generate enough ticket revenue?

Affecting cost savings by paying fewer musicians is a more complex proposition than the usual kind of corporate downsizing.

* * *

UPDATE (Sept. 18): A reader points out other pertinent numbers, in an article by Jenny Jarvie on the website www.artsatl.com: Musicians’ earnings “represent about 25 percent of the total [Atlanta Symphony] budget. According to the International Conference of Symphony and Opera Musicians, that is substantially lower than top orchestras around the country, which average about 40 percent.”

The full article:

www.artsatl.com/2014/09/news-aso-lockout-enters-second-week/
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Sept. 13, Virginia Commonwealth University

You don’t hear many programs in which Joseph Haydn is the second-wittiest composer. The Pacifica Quartet managed that programming feat in its return engagement at Virginia Commonwealth University, opening the new season of Rennolds Chamber Concerts.

The top wit? György Ligeti, the Hungarian-born late-20th century master whose String Quartet No. 1 (“Métamorphoses nocturnes”) is part-homage to Béla Bartók, part-funhouse mirror-in-sound manipulation of a four-note motif into numerous shapes, shades and styles.

What could be a jarringly schizophrenic exercise – evocations of Bartók’s “night music” up against skittishly jazzy numbers and a woozy waltz – is instead a wide-ranging, technically dazzling, sometimes hilarious tonal essay, and a surprisingly compact one whose 12 interlocking movements zip along eventfully and with a coherence that testifies eloquently to Ligeti’s ingenuity.

The Pacifica – violinists Simon Ganatra and Sibbi Bernhardsson, violist Masumi Per Rostad and cellist Brandon Vamos – played the Ligeti with deep engagement and audible affection. The piece plays to several of the ensemble’s greatest strengths, a collective ear for the finest sonic nuance and a knack for highly transparent rendition of parts.

The foursome emphasized the same qualities in Haydn’s Quartet in B flat major, Op. 76, No. 4 (“Sunrise”); and three of the four, Bernhardsson, Rostad and Vamos, also captured the woodsy, rustic quality of Haydn’s string writing, to which few musicians outside historically informed circles are attuned. First violinist Ganatra, however, played against that grain with a bright, penetrating tone that leaped out of the ensemble.

This contrast of voicings – producing, in effect, music for violin and string trio – proved more effective in Felix Mendelssohn’s Quartet in F minor, Op. 80, the composer’s last substantial work, produced in the wake of the death of his sister, Fanny Mendelssohn Henselt (its adagio is an elegy to Fanny), and completed a few months before Felix himself died.

The piece is, stylistically and expressively, quite unlike the more familiar Mendelssohn, even at his most dramatic or turbulent. This music is darker, more intense and with an introspective quality more characteristic of later romantics such as Brahms or Tchaikovsky.

The Pacifica, which has recorded all the Mendelssohn quartets, effectively highlighted the differences in this last one, playing with go-for-broke energy and taut expressivity.

The group rewarded the following ovation with an encore: the taxing allegretto pizzicato from Bartók’s Quartet No. 4.
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Sept. 11
noon-2 p.m. EDT
1600-1800 UTC
1700-1900 GMT
WDCE, University of Richmond
90.1 FM
www.wdce.org

Beethoven: “The Ruins of Athens” – “Turkish March”
Berlin Philharmonic/Claudio Abbado
(Deutsche Grammophon)

Past Masters:
Elgar: “Enigma Variations”
London Symphony Orchestra/Pierre Monteux (Decca)
(recorded 1958)

Haydn: Symphony No. 96 in D major (“Miracle”)
Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra, Amsterdam/
Colin Davis (Philips)

Martinu: “La revue de cuisine”
The Dartington Ensemble (Hyperion)

Poulenc: Piano Concerto
Pascal Rogé, piano
London Chamber Orchestra/Christopher Warren-Green
(Signum Classics)

Weill: “Little Threepenny Music”
London Symphony Orchestra/Michael Tilson Thomas (Sony Classical)
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The Atlanta Symphony Orchestra and its musicians have failed to reach agreement on a new contract, resulting in what the musicians are calling a lockout. They will not receive salaries until a new contract is agreed upon, and the orchestra’s management says the 2014-15 season, scheduled to begin on Sept. 25, may be delayed.

Management, citing “12 consecutive years of deficit operations” and an accumulated debt of about $5 million, offered musicians a 4.5 percent raise over the course of a new contract and a 22 percent share of any budget surplus, but called on musicians to pay more for health insurance and agree to concessions to management in “determining how and when vacancies [in] the orchestra are filled in order to balance the artistic and financial needs of the orchestra.”

The New York Times’ Michael Cooper reported on Sept. 5 that the Atlanta Symphony’s music director, Robert Spano, and principal guest conductor, Donald Runnicles, took the unusual step of writing to the orchestra board and management, asking them “to acknowledge the sacrifice the musicians have already made, and to examine other ways and areas to establish sustainability.” Their letter apparently had no effect.

Musicians, who absorbed wage concessions under the 2012-14 contract that expired Sept. 6, say that ASO management and Atlanta’s Woodruff Arts Center, under whose umbrella the orchestra operates, have “displayed no willingness to find a workable agreement,” insisting on a “ ‘last, best, and final offer,’ under which the musicians would continue to hemorrhage income and lose orchestra positions.”

The Atlanta Journal-Constitution publishes statements from both sides:

http://www.peachpundit.com/2014/09/07/atlanta-symphony-management-fail-to-meet-cba-deadline/
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Sept. 4
noon-2 p.m. EDT
1600-1800 UTC
1700-1900 GMT
WDCE, University of Richmond
90.1 FM
www.wdce.org

Mozart: “Exsultate, jubilate”
Emma Kirkby, soprano
Academy of Ancient Music/Christopher Hogwood
(l’Oiseau Lyre)

Nielsen: Flute Concerto
Emmanuel Pahud, flute
Berlin Philharmonic/
Simon Rattle
(EMI Classics)

Beethoven: “Choral Fantasy”
Yefim Bronfman, piano
Swiss Chamber Choir
Tonhalle Orchestra, Zürich/David Zinman
(Arte Nova)

Berlioz: “Benvenuto Cellini” Overture
Staatskapelle Dresden/
Colin Davis
(RCA Victor)

Grieg: Quartet in G minor
Shanghai Quartet
(Delos)

Past Masters:
Tchaikovsky: “Marche slave”
Chicago Symphony Orchestra/Fritz Reiner
(RCA Victor)
(recorded 1959)

* * * 

As a sponsor of the Fall Line Festival, Sept. 5-6 at downtown Richmond venues, WDCE plans to be on the air around the clock over the coming weekend. I’m taking the 3-5 a.m. (EDT) Saturday shift. The music won’t be classical . . . well, there is that Kurt Weill set, kicked off by Jim Morrison & The Doors . . . and Django Reinhardt and Stephane Grappelli playing “Limehouse Blues” . . . but I shouldn’t spoil all the surprises.
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For your calendar-marking and ticket-buying convenience, here’s an overview of ticketed classical events and festivals in Richmond during the 2014-15 season.

There are fewer conflicts than in past years. Two dueling matinees – Virginia Opera vs. Richmond Symphony on Oct. 5, symphony vs. Richmond Philharmonic on May 3 – and a couple of pops concerts up against chamber-music programs are the only offenders (so far).

There aren’t many blockbusters or game-changers, either. In the former category, the symphony’s performances of Mahler’s “Resurrection” Symphony (No. 2) on Oct. 18-19 qualify. And eighth blackbird, the University of Richmond’s new-music sextet, undoubtedly will spring surprises galore in their programs on Sept. 22 and, with the Sleeping Giant composers’ collective, on March 16. (Some free performances at Virginia Commonwealth University and the University of Richmond, not listed here, also venture off the usual musical turf.)

It will be nice to hear violinist Joshua Bell, appearing in Richmond for the first time since 1989 in the symphony’s Sept. 20 season-opener. He’s playing Bruch’s Concerto No. 1 in G minor, one of his signature showpieces. I can’t say I’ve spent 25 years yearning to hear Bell play this above all other music; but if he delivers the goods, I’m prepared to be dazzled.

In contrast to recent seasons in which it pushed the repertory envelope, Virginia Opera marks its 40th anniversary with a greatest-hits lineup: “Sweeney Todd” (Oct. 3 and 5), “H.M.S. Pinafore” (Nov. 21 and 23), “Salome” (Feb. 6 and 8) and “La Traviata” (March 27 and 29). The latter features the Richmond Symphony as the pit band touring the state – thus, the blank spell on the calendar in early April.

Highlighting chamber-music offerings: the first local performance by pianist Hélène Grimaud (April 22) at UR; return engagements for the Pacifica Quartet (Sept. 13) and St. Lawrence String Quartet (Nov. 15), the Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center (Feb. 28) and violinist Rachel Barton Pine (Jan. 24) at VCU; the annual visit by the Shanghai Quartet with former Guarneri Quartet violist Michael Tree (Jan. 25) and a duo recital by pianist Jonathan Biss and violinist Miriam Fried (Nov. 2) at UR; and James Wilson’s characteristically wide-ranging programming, with extra helpings of solo Bach, for the Chamber Music Society of Central Virginia on various dates in October, January and May.

Following the calendar, you’ll find telephone and online links to the presenting organizations.


SEPTEMBER
10 – Albert Guinovart, piano (UR Modlin Center).
13 – Pacifica Quartet (VCU Singleton Center).
20 – Richmond Symphony/Steven Smith; Joshua Bell, violin (Richmond CenterStage).
22 – eighth blackbird (UR Modlin Center).
26-28 – Alexander Paley Music Festival (St. Luke Evangelical Lutheran Church).
27 – Richmond Symphony Pops/Keitaro Harada; Waterloo (“ABBA – the Music”) (Richmond CenterStage).

OCTOBER
2 – Richmond Symphony/Steven Smith (Rush-Hour concert) (Richmond CenterStage).
3/5 – Virginia Opera: “Sweeney Todd” (Richmond CenterStage).
5 – Richmond Symphony/Steven Smith (Randolph-Macon College).
18-19 – Richmond Symphony & Symphony Chorus/Steven Smith (Mahler’s “Resurrection” Symphony) (Richmond CenterStage).
25 – Richmond Symphony LolliPops/Keitaro Harada (“Beethoven Lives Upstairs”).
25 – New York Brass Arts Trio (VCU Singleton Center).
27 – Chamber Music Society of Central Virginia (Bon Air Presbyterian Church).

NOVEMBER
2 – Jonathan Biss, piano; Miriam Fried, violin (UR Modlin Center).
2 – Richmond Philharmonic/Peter Wilson, conductor & violin (Collegiate School).
7-8 – Third Practice Electroacoustic Music Festival (UR Modlin Center).
8 – Richmond Symphony/Steven Smith; Richard King, French horn (Richmond CenterStage).
13 – Richmond Symphony/Steven Smith; Tom Schneider, bassoon (Rush-Hour concert) (Richmond CenterStage).
15 – St. Lawrence String Quartet (VCU Singleton Center).
16 – Richmond Symphony/Steven Smith; Tom Schneider, bassoon (Randolph-Macon College).
21/23 – Virginia Opera: “H.M.S. Pinafore” (Richmond CenterStage).

DECEMBER
6-7 – Richmond Symphony Pops & Symphony Chorus/conductor TBA (“Let It Snow!”) (Richmond CenterStage).
13 – Richmond Symphony & Chorus/Steven Smith (Handel’s “Messiah”) (Richmond CenterStage).
16 – Chamber Music Society of Central Virginia: Beiliang Zhu & James Wilson, cellos (Holy Comforter Church, Episcopal).

JANUARY
8 – Richmond Symphony/Steven Smith (Rush-Hour concert) (Richmond CenterStage).
10 – Chamber Music Society of Central Virginia (First Unitarian Universalist Church).
11 – Richmond Symphony/Steven Smith (Randolph-Macon College).
12 – Chamber Music Society of Central Virginia (First Unitarian Universalist Church).
17-18 – Richmond Symphony/Steven Smith; Adam Golka, piano (Richmond CenterStage).
24 – Richmond Symphony LolliPops/Keitaro Harada; Charlotte Blake Alston, narrator (“Pinocchio’s Adventures in Funland”) (Richmond CenterStage).
24 – Rachel Barton Pine, violin (VCU Singleton Center).
25 – Shanghai Quartet; Michael Tree, viola (UR Modlin Center).
27 – Richmond Symphony/Steven Smith (Holocaust anniversary program) (Richmond CenterStage).
31 – Richmond Symphony Pops/Keitaro Harada; Preservation Hall Jazz Band (Richmond CenterStage).

FEBRUARY
6/8 – Virginia Opera: “Salome” (Richmond CenterStage).
11 – New York Polyphony (UR Modlin Center).
13 – Richmond Symphony & Symphony Chorus; One Voice Chorus; St. Paul’s Baptist Church Chorus/Steven Smith (Duke Ellington program) (St. Paul’s Baptist Church).
14 – Richmond Symphony & Symphony Chorus; One Voice Chorus; St. Paul’s Baptist Church Chorus/Steven Smith (Duke Ellington program) (Richmond CenterStage).
22 – Chamber Music Society of Central Virginia: Carsten Schmidt, harpsichord (Holy Comforter Church, Episcopal).
28 – Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center (VCU Singleton Center).
28 – Richmond Symphony Pops/Keitaro Harada; vocalists TBA (“Wicked Divas”) (Richmond CenterStage).

MARCH
7 – Richmond Symphony/Tito Muñoz; Stanislav Khristenko, piano (Richmond CenterStage).
8 – Richmond Philharmonic/Peter Wilson; Sheri Oyan, also saxophone (Collegiate School).
16 – eighth blackbird; Sleeping Giant (UR Modlin Center).
21 – Richmond Symphony LolliPops/Keitaro Harada (“Orchestra Games”) (Richmond CenterStage).
27/29 – Virginia Opera: “La Traviata” (Richmond CenterStage).

APRIL
18-19 – Richmond Symphony/Steven Smith; Daisuke Yamamoto, violin (Richmond CenterStage).
22 – Hélène Grimaud, piano (UR Modlin Center).

MAY
2 – Richard Goode, piano; Sarah Shafer, soprano (VCU Singleton Center).
3 – Richmond Symphony/Steven Smith; Lynette Wardle, harp (Randolph-Macon College).
3 – Richmond Philharmonic/Peter Wilson; Jack Glatzer, violin (Collegiate School).
9-10 – Richmond Symphony & Symphony Chorus/Steven Smith (Richmond CenterStage).
16 – Richmond Symphony/conductor TBA (“Bugs Bunny at the Symphony II”) (Altria Theater).
17 – Chamber Music Society of Central Virginia (First Unitarian Universalist Church).
19 – Chamber Music Society of Central Virginia (First Unitarian Universalist Church).


RICHMOND SYMPHONY:
(800) 514-3849 (ETIX)
www.richmondsymphony.com

VIRGINIA OPERA:
(866) 673-7282
www.vaopera.org

UR MODLIN CENTER:
(804) 289-8980
www.modlin.richmond.edu

VCU RENNOLDS CONCERTS:
(804) 828-6776
www.arts.vcu.edu/music

RICHMOND PHILHARMONIC:
(804) 673-7400
www.richmondphilharmonic.org

CHAMBER MUSIC SOCIETY OF CENTRAL VIRGINIA:
(804) 519-2098
www.cmscva.org

ALEXANDER PALEY MUSIC FESTIVAL:
(804) 665-9516
www.paleyfestival.info
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Richmond Symphony cellist Jason McComb and University of Richmond-based pianist Joanne Kong were the box-office champions in the first Summer at CenterStage series.

Defying concerns that classical music might be a poor summertime draw at a downtown venue, the eight-program series played to mostly capacity crowds in Richmond CenterStage’s Gottwald Playhouse.

For drawing the fullest house on July 31, McComb and Kong were awarded busts of Johannes Brahms, whose sonatas were featured this summer.

A second summer season is planned for 2015. Organizers – the Richmond Symphony, University of Richmond and Virginia Commonwealth University music departments and CenterStage – are contemplating programs of French chamber music.
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For your calendar-marking and ticket-buying convenience, here’s an overview of ticketed classical events and festivals in Richmond during the 2014-15 season.

There are fewer conflicts than in past years. Two dueling matinees – Virginia Opera vs. Richmond Symphony on Oct. 5, symphony vs. Richmond Philharmonic on May 3 – and a couple of pops concerts up against chamber-music programs are the only offenders (so far).

There aren’t many blockbusters or game-changers, either. In the former category, the symphony’s performances of Mahler’s “Resurrection” Symphony (No. 2) on Oct. 18-19 qualify. And eighth blackbird, the University of Richmond’s new-music sextet, undoubtedly will spring surprises galore in their programs on Sept. 22 and, with the Sleeping Giant composers’ collective, on March 16. (Some free performances at Virginia Commonwealth University and the University of Richmond, not listed here, also venture off the usual musical turf.)

It will be nice to hear violinist Joshua Bell, appearing in Richmond for the first time since 1989 in the symphony’s Sept. 20 season-opener. He’s playing Bruch’s Concerto No. 1 in G minor, one of his signature showpieces. I can’t say I’ve spent 25 years yearning to hear Bell play this above all other music; but if he delivers the goods, I’m prepared to be dazzled.

In contrast to recent seasons in which it pushed the repertory envelope, Virginia Opera marks its 40th anniversary with a greatest-hits lineup: “Sweeney Todd” (Oct. 3 and 5), “H.M.S. Pinafore” (Nov. 21 and 23), “Salome” (Feb. 6 and 8) and “La Traviata” (March 27 and 29). The latter features the Richmond Symphony as the pit band touring the state – thus, the largely blank weeks on the calendar in late March and early April.

Highlighting chamber-music offerings: the first local performance by pianist Hélène Grimaud (April 22) at UR; return engagements for the Pacifica Quartet (Sept. 13) and St. Lawrence String Quartet (Nov. 15), the Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center (Feb. 28) and violinist Rachel Barton Pine (Jan. 24) at VCU; the annual visit by the Shanghai Quartet with former Guarneri Quartet violist Michael Tree (Jan. 25) and a duo recital by pianist Jonathan Biss and violinist Miriam Fried (Nov. 2) at UR; and James Wilson’s characteristically wide-ranging programming, with extra helpings of solo Bach, for the Chamber Music Society of Central Virginia on various dates in October, January and May.

Following the calendar, you’ll find telephone and online links to the presenting organizations.


SEPTEMBER
10 – Albert Guinovart, piano (UR Modlin Center).
13 – Pacifica Quartet (VCU Singleton Center).
20 – Richmond Symphony/Steven Smith; Joshua Bell, violin (Richmond CenterStage).
22 – eighth blackbird (UR Modlin Center).
26-28 – Alexander Paley Music Festival (St. Luke Evangelical Lutheran Church).
27 – Richmond Symphony Pops/Keitaro Harada; Waterloo (“ABBA – the Music”) (Richmond CenterStage).

OCTOBER
2 – Richmond Symphony/Steven Smith (Rush-Hour concert) (Richmond CenterStage).
3/5 – Virginia Opera: “Sweeney Todd” (Richmond CenterStage).
5 – Richmond Symphony/Steven Smith (Randolph-Macon College).
18-19 – Richmond Symphony & Symphony Chorus/Steven Smith (Mahler’s “Resurrection” Symphony) (Richmond CenterStage).
25 – Richmond Symphony LolliPops/Keitaro Harada (“Beethoven Lives Upstairs”).
25 – New York Brass Arts Trio (VCU Singleton Center).
27 – Chamber Music Society of Central Virginia (Bon Air Presbyterian Church).

NOVEMBER
2 – Jonathan Biss, piano; Miriam Fried, violin (UR Modlin Center).
2 – Richmond Philharmonic/Peter Wilson, conductor & violin (Collegiate School).
7-8 – Third Practice Electroacoustic Music Festival (UR Modlin Center).
8 – Richmond Symphony/Steven Smith; Richard King, French horn (Richmond CenterStage).
13 – Richmond Symphony/Steven Smith; Tom Schneider, bassoon (Rush-Hour concert) (Richmond CenterStage).
15 – St. Lawrence String Quartet (VCU Singleton Center).
16 – Richmond Symphony/Steven Smith; Tom Schneider, bassoon (Randolph-Macon College).
21/23 – Virginia Opera: “H.M.S. Pinafore” (Richmond CenterStage).

DECEMBER
6-7 – Richmond Symphony Pops & Symphony Chorus/conductor TBA (“Let It Snow!”) (Richmond CenterStage).
13 – Richmond Symphony & Chorus/Steven Smith (Handel’s “Messiah”) (Richmond CenterStage).
16 – Chamber Music Society of Central Virginia: Beiliang Zhu & James Wilson, cellos (Holy Comforter Church, Episcopal).

JANUARY
8 – Richmond Symphony/Steven Smith (Rush-Hour concert) (Richmond CenterStage).
10 – Chamber Music Society of Central Virginia (First Unitarian Universalist Church).
11 – Richmond Symphony/Steven Smith (Randolph-Macon College).
12 – Chamber Music Society of Central Virginia (First Unitarian Universalist Church).
17-18 – Richmond Symphony/Steven Smith; Adam Golka, piano (Richmond CenterStage).
24 – Richmond Symphony LolliPops/Keitaro Harada; Charlotte Blake Alston, narrator (“Pinocchio’s Adventures in Funland”) (Richmond CenterStage).
24 – Rachel Barton Pine, violin (VCU Singleton Center).
25 – Shanghai Quartet; Michael Tree, viola (UR Modlin Center).
27 – Richmond Symphony/Steven Smith (Holocaust anniversary program) (Richmond CenterStage).
31 – Richmond Symphony Pops/Keitaro Harada; Preservation Hall Jazz Band (Richmond CenterStage).

FEBRUARY
6/8 – Virginia Opera: “Salome” (Richmond CenterStage).
11 – New York Polyphony (UR Modlin Center).
13 – Richmond Symphony & Symphony Chorus; One Voice Chorus; St. Paul’s Baptist Church Chorus/Steven Smith (Duke Ellington program) (St. Paul’s Baptist Church).
14 – Richmond Symphony & Symphony Chorus; One Voice Chorus; St. Paul’s Baptist Church Chorus/Steven Smith (Duke Ellington program) (Richmond CenterStage).
22 – Chamber Music Society of Central Virginia: Carsten Schmidt, harpsichord (Holy Comforter Church, Episcopal).
28 – Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center (VCU Singleton Center).
28 – Richmond Symphony Pops/Keitaro Harada; vocalists TBA (“Wicked Divas”) (Richmond CenterStage).

MARCH
7 – Richmond Symphony/Tito Muñoz; Stanislav Khristenko, piano (Richmond CenterStage).
8 – Richmond Philharmonic/Peter Wilson; Sheri Oyan, also saxophone (Collegiate School).
16 – eighth blackbird; Sleeping Giant (UR Modlin Center).
21 – Richmond Symphony LolliPops/Keitaro Harada (“Orchestra Games”) (Richmond CenterStage).
27/29 – Virginia Opera: “La Traviata” (Richmond CenterStage).

APRIL
18-19 – Richmond Symphony/Steven Smith; Daisuke Yamamoto, violin (Richmond CenterStage).
22 – Hélène Grimaud, piano (UR Modlin Center).

MAY
2 – Richard Goode, piano; Sarah Shafer, soprano (VCU Singleton Center).
3 – Richmond Symphony/Steven Smith; Lynette Wardle, harp (Randolph-Macon College).
3 – Richmond Philharmonic/Peter Wilson; Jack Glatzer, violin (Collegiate School).
9-10 – Richmond Symphony & Symphony Chorus/Steven Smith (Richmond CenterStage).
16 – Richmond Symphony/conductor TBA (“Bugs Bunny at the Symphony II”) (Altria Theater).
17 – Chamber Music Society of Central Virginia (First Unitarian Universalist Church).
19 – Chamber Music Society of Central Virginia (First Unitarian Universalist Church).


RICHMOND SYMPHONY:
(800) 514-3849 (ETIX)
www.richmondsymphony.com

VIRGINIA OPERA:
(866) 673-7282
www.vaopera.org

UR MODLIN CENTER:
(804) 289-8980
www.modlin.richmond.edu

VCU RENNOLDS CONCERTS:
(804) 828-6776
www.arts.vcu.edu/music

RICHMOND PHILHARMONIC:
(804) 673-7400
www.richmondphilharmonic.org

CHAMBER MUSIC SOCIETY OF CENTRAL VIRGINIA:
(804) 519-2098
www.cmscva.org

ALEXANDER PALEY MUSIC FESTIVAL:
(804) 665-9516
www.paleyfestival.info
4 months ago | |
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