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Clarke Bustard
The Virginia Classical Music Blog
1094 Entries

Musical migrations: The young Mozart visits Italy, in search of patronage and to perfect his craft. . . . Three New Englanders make their bids in the big city, New York. . . . Three Europeans flee persecution and war to settle in Britain and the United States.

Feb. 5
11 a.m.-2 p.m. EST
1600-1900 UTC/GMT
WDCE, University of Richmond
90.1 FM
www.wdce.org

Mozart: Symphony No. 13 in F major, K. 112
Academy of Ancient Music/Christopher Hogwood (L’Oiseau Lyre)

Myslivecek: Violin Concerto in G major (“Pastoral”)
Shizuka Ishikawa, violin
Dvorák Chamber Orchestra/Libor Pešek (Supraphon)

Mozart: “Exsultate, jubilate,” K. 165
Cecilia Bartoli, mezzo-soprano
Vienna Chamber Orchestra/György Fischer (Decca)

Past Masters:
Ives: “Central Park in the Dark”
New York Philharmonic/Seiji Ozawa & Maurice Peress (Sony Classical)
(recorded 1962)

Bernstein:
“On the Waterfront” Suite
Bournemouth Symphony Orchestra/Marin Alsop (Naxos)

Nico Muhly: Cello Concerto
Zuill Bailey, cello
Indianapolis Symphony Orchestra/Jun Märkl (Steinway & Sons)

Past Masters:
Bernstein: “On the Town: Three Dance Episodes”
New York Philharmonic/Leonard Bernstein
(Sony Classical)
(recorded 1963)

Berthold Goldschmidt: “Ciaconna sinfonica”
City of Birmingham Symphony Orchestra/Simon Rattle (London)

Martinu: Symphony No. 1
Czech Philharmonic/Václav Neumann (Supraphon)

Weill: “One Touch of Venus” –
“I’m a Stranger Here Myself”
“Westwind”
“Speak Low”
Ute Lemper, vocalist
RIAS Berlin Chamber Ensemble/John Mauceri (London)
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Aldo Ciccolini, the Italian-born French pianist most widely known for his recordings of the solo-piano music of Erik Satie, has died at 89.

Although he made French music his specialty, Ciccolini also performed and recorded a range of other repertory, including the sonatas of Mozart and Beethoven. He was a highly regarded teacher at the Paris Conservatoire in the 1970s and ’80s; among his students were Jean-Yves Thibaudet and Nicholas Angelich.

Ciccolini performed several times with the Richmond Symphony in the 1980s. His first engagement here, in which he played Liszt and Franck on an oversized, snow-white Bösendorfer concert grand, was especially memorable.

An obituary from the British music magazine Gramophone:

http://www.gramophone.co.uk/classical-music-news/the-pianist-aldo-ciccolini-has-died

The English pianist Mark Bebbington recalls Ciccolini as a teacher, on Norman Lebrecht’s Slipped Disc blog:

http://slippedisc.com/2015/02/i-was-mesmerised-by-my-teacher-aldo-ciccolini/

Ciccolini plays Satie’s “Gymnopedie” No. 1 at his 85th birthday concert in 2010:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0peXnOnDgQ8
4 months ago | |
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Classical performances in and around Richmond, with selected events elsewhere in Virginia and the Washington area. Program information, provided by presenters, is updated as details become available. Adult single-ticket prices are listed; senior, student/youth, group and other discounts may be offered.

WEATHER ADVISORY: A snowstorm on Feb. 25-26, with heaviest accumulations forecast in central and southeastern Virginia, may cause cancellation or postponement of events. Check with presenters before heading out.

* In and around Richmond: Virginia Opera brings its production of Richard Strauss’ “Salome,” starring Kelly Cae Hogan, to Richmond CenterStage on Feb. 6 and 8 (with performances the following weekend at George Mason University’s Center for the Arts in Fairfax). . . . A cast of string, keyboard and vocal artists pay tribute to Francis Church, the late cellist and longtime music critic of The Richmond News Leader, Feb. 8 at Bon Air Presbyterian Church. . . . The vocal quartet New York Polyphony presents “A Lily Among Thorns,” a program of early music spiced with contemporary works, Feb. 11 at the University of Richmond’s Modlin Arts Center. . . . Steven Smith conducts the Richmond Symphony, joined by vocalists Lester Lynch and Nate Smith, the One Voice Chorus and Richmond Symphony Chorus, in a Black History Month salute to Duke Ellington, Feb. 14 at Richmond CenterStage. . . . Keitaro Harada conducts the symphony Youth Orchestra Program ensembles, with guest violinist Wanzhen Li, in a free “Celebration of China,” Feb. 15 at Richmond CenterStage. . . . A stellar foursome from New York’s Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center – pianist Wu Han, violinist Daniel Hope, violist Paul Neubauer and cellist David Finckel – play piano quartets of Mahler, Schumann and Brahms on Feb. 28 in a Rennolds Chamber Concerts program at Virginia Commonwealth University’s Singleton Arts Center.

* Noteworthy elsewhere: Organist and showman Cameron Carpenter performs on Feb. 4 at Washington’s Kennedy Center. . . . Nicholas McGegan conducts members of the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra in music of J.S. Bach and his sons, C.P.E. and J.C. Bach, Feb. 12 at Strathmore in the Maryland suburbs of DC. . . . The widely lauded Jerusalem Quartet plays Haydn, Schubert and Erwin Schulhoff, Feb. 17 at the University of Virginia in Charlottesville. . . . Pianist Richard Goode and friends play Schumann and Brahms, Feb. 18 at the Library of Congress in Washington. . . . Composer-conductor Matthias Pintscher leads the National Symphony Orchestra in the U.S. premiere of his Violin Concerto (“Ma’reh”), with Karen Gomyo as soloist, in a program also featuring music of Fauré and Ravel, Feb. 19-21 at the Kennedy Center. . . . Washington National Opera opens its new, English-language production of Poulenc’s “Dialogues of the Carmelites” on Feb. 21, 23 and 27 (with more dates in March) at the Kennedy Center. . . . Soprano Renée Fleming, accompanied by pianist Olga Kern, performs in a Virginia Arts Festival-sponsored recital on Feb. 17 at the Harrison Opera House in Norfolk, on Feb. 20 at the Paramount Theater in Charlottesville and on Feb. 23 at the Kennedy Center. . . . Pianist Emanuel Ax joins Herbert Blomstedt and the National Symphony in all-Beethoven program, including the Piano Concerto No. 3 and “Eroica” Symphony, Feb. 26-28 at the Kennedy Center. . . . Cellist Amit Peled plays Dvorák’s Cello Concerto in B minor with JoAnn Falleta and the Virginia Symphony in a program also featuring works of Libby Larsen and Aaron Copland, Feb. 27-28 and March 1 at venues in Newport News, Norfolk and Virginia Beach.


Feb. 1 (3 p.m.)
Camp Concert Hall, Modlin Arts Center, University of Richmond
Richard Becker, piano
works by Beethoven, Chopin, Debussy, others
free
(804) 289-8980
www.modlin.richmond.edu

Feb. 1 (2:30 p.m.)
Feb. 3 (7:30 p.m.)
Harrison Opera House, 160 E. Virginia Beach Boulevard, Norfolk
Virginia Opera
Ari Pelto conducting
Richard Strauss: “Salome”
Kelly Cae Hogan (Salome)
Alan Woodrow (Herod)
Katharine Goeldner (Herodias)
Michael Chioldi (Jochanaan)
Samuel Levine (Narraboth)
Stephen Lawless, stage director
in German, English captions
$19-$99
(866) 673-7282
www.vaopera.org

Feb. 1 (2:30 p.m.)
Sandler Arts Center, 201 S. Market St., Virginia Beach
Virginia Symphony
JoAnn Falletta conducting
Vaughan Williams: “Fantasia on a Theme by Thomas Tallis”
Beethoven: Symphony No. 9 in D minor (“Choral”)
Aundi Moore, soprano
Stacey Rishoi, mezzo-soprano
Vale Rideout, tenor
Kevin Deas, baritone
Virginia Symphony Chorus
Robert Shoup directing
$25-$107
(757) 892-6366
www.virginiasymphony.org

Feb. 2 (7:30 p.m.)
Camp Concert Hall, Modlin Arts Center, University of Richmond
Neumann Lecture on Music:
Jessie Ann Owens
“Cipriano de Rore and the Search for Music”
free
(804) 289-8980
www.modlin.richmond.edu

Feb. 3 (7:30 p.m.)
Terrace Theater, Kennedy Center, Washington
Vocal Arts DC:
Karine Deshayes, mezzo-soprano
Carrie-Ann Matheson, piano
works by Fauré, Debussy, Louÿs, Berlioz, Gounod, Bizet, Delibes, Duparc
$50
(800) 444-1324
www.kennedy-center.org

Feb. 4 (8 p.m.)
Kennedy Center Concert Hall, Washington
Cameron Carpenter, organ
works by Bach, Mozart, Rachmaninoff, Walton
$15
(800) 444-1324
www.kennedy-center.org

Feb. 4 (8 p.m.)
Coolidge Auditorium, Library of Congress, First Street at Independence Avenue N.E., Washington
Calefax reed quintet
works by Ockeghem, Franck, Nancarrow, Richard Strauss, Shostakovich
free; tickets required
(703) 573-7328 (Ticketmaster)
www.loc.gov/concerts

Feb. 5 (7 p.m.)
Feb. 6 (8 p.m.)
Feb. 7 (8 p.m.)
Kennedy Center Concert Hall, Washington
National Symphony Orchestra
Juraj Valcuha conducting
Stravinsky: “Pulcinella” Suite
Bruch: Violin Concerto No. 1 in G minor
Vilde Frang, violin
Tchaikovsky: Symphony No. 5 in E minor
$10-$85
(800) 444-1324
www.kennedy-center.org

Feb. 5 (8 p.m.)
Music Center at Strathmore, 5301 Tuckerman Lane, North Bethesda, MD
Baltimore Symphony Orchestra
Marin Alsop conducting
Rachmaninoff: Piano Concerto No. 2 in C minor
Garrick Ohlsson, piano
Respighi: “Church Windows”
Respighi: “The Pines of Rome”
$45-$110
(877) 276-1444 (Baltimore Symphony box office)
www.strathmore.org

Feb. 6 (8 p.m.)
Feb. 8 (2:30 p.m.)
Carpenter Theatre, Richmond CenterStage, Sixth and Grace streets
Virginia Opera
Ari Pelto conducting
Richard Strauss: “Salome”
Kelly Cae Hogan (Salome)
Alan Woodrow (Herod)
Katharine Goeldner (Herodias)
Michael Chioldi (Jochanaan)
Samuel Levine (Narraboth)
Stephen Lawless, stage director
in German, English captions
$15.25-$105.93
(800) 514-3849 (ETIX)
www.vaopera.org

Feb. 6 (8 p.m.)
Ferguson Arts Center, Christopher Newport University, Newport News
Feb. 7 (8 p.m.)
Chrysler Hall, 215 St. Paul’s Boulevard, Norfolk
Virginia Symphony Pops
Benjamin Rous conducting
“At the Movies with the Music of John Williams”
$25-$93
(757) 892-6366
www.virginiasymphony.org

Feb. 6 (8 p.m.)
The Barns at Wolf Trap, Trap Road, Vienna
Montrose Trio
Turina: Piano Trio in D minor, Op. 76
Beethoven: Piano Trio in E flat major, Op. 1, No. 1
Tchaikovsky: Piano Trio in A minor, Op. 51
$35
(888) 945-2468 (Tickets.com)
www.wolftrap.org

Feb. 7 (8 p.m.)
Center for the Arts, George Mason University, Fairfax
Fairfax Symphony Orchestra
Christopher Zimmerman conducting
Dvorák: Symphony No. 8 in G major
Sylvie Borodová: Symphony No. 1 (U.S. premiere)
$25-$50
(888) 945-2468 (Tickets.com)
www.fairfaxsymphony.org

Feb. 7 (2 p.m.)
Coolidge Auditorium, Library of Congress, First Street at Independence Avenue N.E., Washington
Ian Bostridge, tenor
Julius Drake, piano
Schubert: “Die Winterreise”
SOLD OUT (rush tickets at door beginning at noon)
www.loc.gov/concerts

Feb. 7 (8 p.m.)
Music Center at Strathmore, 5301 Tuckerman Lane, North Bethesda, MD
Brian Ganz, piano
Chopin: 4 mazurkas, Op. 24
Chopin: Polonaise in F sharp minor, Op. 44
Chopin: 3 mazurkas, Op. 50
Chopin: 3 waltzes, Op. 64
Chopin: nocturnes, Op. 15, Nos. 2-3
Chopin: 3 mazurkas, Op. 59
Chopin: “Rondo a la Mazur,” Op. 5
$28-$84
(301) 581-5100
www.strathmore.org

Feb. 8 (3 p.m.)
River Road Church, Baptist, River and Ridge roads, Richmond
One Voice Chorus
Lynn Atkins directing
Rassan H. Bourke, organ
“Celebration of Black History Month”
program TBA
free
(804) 288-1131
www.rrcb.org

Feb. 8 (4 p.m.) 
Bon Air Presbyterian Church, 9201 W. Huguenot Road, Richmond
Second Sunday South of the James: 
concert in tribute to Francis Church
Murray-Lohuis Duo (Robert Murray, violin; Ardyth Lohius, organ)
Charles Lindsey, organ
Bob Ford & Pamela McClain, piano
trio: Lili Boyd, flute; Vivian Boyd, violin; Grayson Boyd, cello
ensemble, Suzanne Maarz directing
string quartet: Bill Kinzie & Sandy Shelton, violins; David Ray, viola; Patricia Bray, cello
Mellow Cello Quartet
Bon Air Presbyterian Chancel Choir ensemble
duo: Marty Dorrill, flute; James Kidd, piano
program TBA
donation requested 
(804) 272-7514
www.bonairpc.org

Feb. 8 (4 p.m.)
St. Matthias’ Episcopal Church, 11300 W. Huguenot Road, Midlothian
Mauro Correa, guitar
Bel’Aria String Quartet
works by Villa-Lobos, Piazzolla, Gismonti, others
donation requested
(804) 272-8588
www.stmatmidlo.com

Feb. 8 (3 p.m.)
Music Center at Strathmore, 5301 Tuckerman Lane, North Bethesda, MD
National Philharmonic
Piotr Gajewski conducting
Andreas Makris: “Strathmore” Overture
Tchaikovsky: “Variations on a Rococo Theme”
Summer Hu, cello
Chopin: “Grande Polonaise brilliante”
Brian Ganz, piano
Beethoven: Symphony No. 9 in D minor (“Choral”)
Danielle Talamantes, soprano
Margaret Mezzacappa, mezzo-soprano
Colin Eaton, tenor
Norman Garrett, baritone
National Philharmonic Chorale
Stan Engebretson directing
$28-$94 (waiting list)
(301) 581-5100
www.strathmore.org

Feb. 10 (7:30 p.m.)
Terrace Theater, Kennedy Center, Washington
Fortas Chamber Music Concerts:
Kalichstein-Laredo-Robinson Trio:
Joseph Kalichstein, piano
Jaime Laredo, violin
Sharon Robinson, cello
Beethoven: Piano Trio in G minor, Op. 121a (“Kakadu”)
Dvorák: Piano Trio in G minor, Op. 26
Tchaikovsky: Piano Trio in A minor, Op. 50
$49
(800) 444-1324
www.kennedy-center.org

Feb. 11 (7:30 p.m.)
Camp Concert Hall, Modlin Arts Center, University of Richmond
New York Polyphony
“A Lily Among Thorns”
Guerrero: “Regina caeli”
Guerrero: “Quae est ista/Surge propera” 
Byterring: “Nesciens mater” 
Power: “Beata progenies/Psalm 117” 
Dunstable: “Speciosa facta est” 
Pyamour: “Quam pulchra es” 
Plummer: “Tota pulchra es” 
Brumel: “Sicut lilium” 
Clemens: “Ego flos campi/Sub umbra illius” 
Roll: “There Is No Rose” 
other works TBA
$36
(804) 289-8980
www.modlin.richmond.edu

Feb. 12 (8 p.m.)
Music Center at Strathmore, 5301 Tuckerman Lane, North Bethesda, MD
Baltimore Symphony Orchestra
Nicholas McGegan conducting 
J.S. Bach: Suite No. 4 in D major, BWV 1069 
J.S. Bach: Concerto in D minor, BWV , for two violins 
Jonathan Carney & Madeline Adkins, violins 
C.P.E. Bach: Symphony in E flat major, Wq 179 
J.C. Bach: Sinfonia concertante in C major for flute, oboe, violin and cello
Emily Skala, flute 
Katherine Needleman, oboe 
Igor Yuzefovich, violin 
Dariuz Skoraczewski, cello 
$32-$95 
(877) 276-1444 (Baltimore Symphony box office) 
www.strathmore.org

Feb. 13 (8 p.m.)
Ferguson Arts Center, Christopher Newport University, Newport News 
Feb. 14 (8 p.m.) 
Chrysler Hall, 215 St. Paul’s Boulevard, Norfolk 
Feb. 15 (2:30 p.m.) 
Sandler Arts Center, 201 S. Market St., Virginia Beach 
Virginia Symphony 
JoAnn Falletta conducting 
Wagner: “Tristan und Isolde” – Prelude and “Liebestod” 
Tchaikovsky: “Romeo and Juliet” Fantasy-Overture 
Rachmaninoff: Symphony No. 2
$25-$107
(757) 892-6366
www.virginiasymphony.org

Feb. 14 (2 p.m.)
Gellman Room, Richmond Public Library, First and Franklin streets
Jefferson Baroque
amorous music from 16th-18th centuries
works TBA
free
(804) 646-7223
www.richmondpubliclibrary.org
 
Feb. 14 (8 p.m.)
Carpenter Theatre, Richmond CenterStage, Sixth and Grace streets
Richmond Symphony
Steven Smith conducting 
Lester Lynch & Nate Smith, vocalists 
One Voice Chorus 
Lynn Atkins directing
Richmond Symphony Chorus 
Erin R. Freeman directing 
“An Evening of Duke Ellington” 
Ellington: “The Three Black Kings” 
Ellington: “Night Creature” 
Ellington: “Harlem”
Ellington: “The Best of the Sacred Concerts” (excerpts) 
$10-$78 
(800) 514-3849 (ETIX) 
www.richmondsymphony.com

Feb. 14 (8 p.m.) 
Old Cabell Hall, University of Virginia, Charlottesville 
Feb. 15 (3:30 p.m.) 
Martin Luther King Jr. Performing Arts Center, Charlottesville High School, 1400 Melbourne Road
Charlottesville Symphony at the University of Virginia 
Kate Tamarkin conducting 
Mendelssohn: “A Midsummer Night’s Dream” Overture 
Borodin: Nocturne 
Stephen Warbeck: “Shakespeare in Love” Suite 
Prokofiev: “Romeo and Juliet” suites Nos. 1-2 
$10-$45 
(434) 924-3376 
www.music.virginia.edu

Feb. 14 (8 p.m.)
Feb. 15 (2 p.m.)
Center for the Arts, George Mason University, Fairfax
Virginia Opera 
Ari Pelto conducting 
Richard Strauss: “Salome” 
Kelly Cae Hogan (Salome) 
Alan Woodrow (Herod) 
Katharine Goeldner (Herodias) 
Michael Chioldi (Jochanaan) 
Samuel Levine (Narraboth) 
Stephen Lawless, stage director
in German, English captions 
$44-$98 
(888) 945-2468 (Tickets.com) 
www.vaopera.org

Feb. 14 (8 p.m.)
Kennedy Center Concert Hall, Washington 
National Symphony Orchestra Pops 
Steven Reineke conducting 
Seth McFarlane, vocalist 
Valentine’s Day program
$22-$88 
(800) 444-1324 
www.kennedy-center.org

Feb. 15 (4 p.m.)
Carpenter Theatre, Richmond CenterStage, Sixth and Grace streets
Richmond Symphony Youth Orchestra Program 
Keitaro Harada conducting 
“Celebration of China” 
Bright Sheng: “Shanghai” Overture 
Bliss Wiant & Ching-fu T’ien: “Ming Yue Han Xing” 
Konrad Kossell: “Stars of Ice, Wheel of Moonlight Bright” 
Chen Gang & He Zhanhao: “Butterfly Lovers” Concerto
Wanzhen Li, violin 
Larry Lang: “Snow Forest” 
Li Huanzhi: “Spring Festival” Overture 
free 
(804) 788-4717 
www.richmondsymphony.com

Feb. 15 (3 p.m.)
Feb. 16 (7:30 p.m.) 
Shaftman Performance Hall, Jefferson Center, 541 Luck Ave., Roanoke
Feb. 17 (7:30 p.m.) 
Fife Theatre, Davis Performance Hall, Virginia Tech Arts Center, 190 Alumni Mall, Blacksburg 
Roanoke Symphony
David Stewart Wiley conducting 
Mozart: Symphony No. 36 in C major, K. 425 (“Linz”) 
Vaughan Williams: “Fantasia on a Theme by Thomas Tallis” 
Tchaikovsky: Piano Concerto No. 1 in B flat minor 
Tanya Gabrielian, piano 
$25-$55 
(540) 343-9127 
www.rso.com

Feb. 17 (7:30 p.m.)
Harrison Opera House, 160 E. Virginia Beach Boulevard, Norfolk
Virginia Arts Festival:
Renée Fleming, soprano
Olga Kern, piano
works by Schumann, Rachmaninoff, Richard Strauss
$35-$85
(757) 282-2822
www.vafest.org

Feb. 17 (8 p.m.)
Old Cabell Hall, University of Virginia, Charlottesville
Tuesday Evening Concerts: 
Jerusalem Quartet 
Haydn: Quartet in G minor, Op. 74, No. 3 (“Rider”) 
Erwin Schulhoff: “Five Pieces” 
Schubert: Quartet in D minor, D. 810 (“Death and the Maiden”) 
$12-$33 
(434) 924-3376 
www.tecs.org

Feb. 18 (8 p.m.)
Coolidge Auditorium, Library of Congress, First Street at Independence Avenue N.E., Washington 
Richard Goode, piano 
Itamar Zorman, violin 
Kyle Armbrust, viola 
Brook Speltz, cello 
Schumann: Piano Trio in F major, Op. 80 
Schumann: “Humoreske,” Op. 20 
Brahms: Piano Quartet in A major, Op. 26 
free; tickets required
(703) 573-7328 (Ticketmaster) 
www.loc.gov/concerts

Feb. 19 (7 p.m.) 
Feb. 20 (8 p.m.) 
Feb. 21 (8 p.m.) 
Kennedy Center Concert Hall, Washington 
National Symphony Orchestra 
Matthias Pintscher conducting 
Fauré: “Pelleas et Melisande” Suite 
Pintscher: Violin Concerto (“Mar’eh”) (U.S. premiere) 
Karen Gomyo, violin 
Ravel: “Daphnis et Chloé” 
Washington Master Chorale 
Thomas Colohan directing 
$10-$85 
(800) 444-1324 
www.kennedy-center.org

Feb. 20 (8 p.m.) 
Constant Convocation Center, 4320 Hampton Boulevard, Norfolk 
Virginia Symphony 
Brett Havens conducting 
with rock band 
“Music of the Rolling Stones” 
$21-$63 
(757) 892-6366 
www.virginiasymphony.org

Feb. 20 (8 p.m.)
Paramount Theater, 215 E. Main St., Charlottesville 
Renée Fleming, soprano 
Olga Kern, piano 
program TBA 
$49.50-$250
(434) 979-1333 
www.theparamount.net

Feb. 20 (8 p.m.) 
Coolidge Auditorium, Library of Congress, First Street at Independence Avenue N.E., Washington 
Claremont Trio
Misha Armory, viola 
Fanny Mendelssohn-Hensel: Piano Trio in D minor, Op. 11 
Helen Grime: “Three Whistler Miniatures” 
Brahms: Piano Quartet in C minor, Op. 60 
free; tickets required 
(703) 573-7328 (Ticketmaster) 
www.loc.gov/concerts

Feb. 21 (3 p.m.) 
Kennedy Center Concert Hall, Washington 
Orchestre de la Suisse Romande 
Charles Dutoit conducting 
Debussy: “Iberia” 
Rachmaninoff: “Rhapsody on a Theme of Paganini” 
Nikolai Lugansky, piano 
Stravinsky: “Le chant du rossignol” (“Song of the Nightingale”)
Ravel: “La Valse”
$35-$95 
(202) 785-9727 (Washington Performing Arts Society) 
www.wpas.org

Feb. 21 (7 p.m.) 
Feb. 23 (7 p.m.) 
Feb. 27 (7:30 p.m.) 
Kennedy Center Opera House, Washington 
Washington National Opera 
Antony Walker conducting 
Poulenc: “Dialogues of the Carmelites”
Leah Crocetto (Madame Lidoine)
Layla Claire (Blanche de la Force) 
Dolora Zajick (Madame de Croissy) 
Elizabeth Bishop (Mother Marie) 
Ashley Emerson (Sister Constance) 
Alan Held (Marquis de la Force) 
Shawn Mathey (Chevalier de la Force) 
Robert Baker (Chaplain) 
Francesca Zambello, stage director 
in English, English captions 
$25-$300 
(800) 444-1324 
www.kennedy-center.org

Feb. 22 (4 p.m.) 
Center for the Arts, George Mason University, Fairfax 
Christopher O’Riley & Pablo Ziegler, pianos 
“Two to Tango” 
works by Astor Piazzolla, others 
$28-$46 
(888) 945-2468 (Tickets.com) 
www.cfa.gmu.edu

Feb. 23 (7:30 p.m.) 
Camp Concert Hall, Modlin Arts Center, University of Richmond 
Paul Hanson, piano
J.S. Bach: “The Well-Tempered Clavier” (excerpts) 
Liszt: “Variations on Bach’s ‘Weinen, Klagen, Sorgen, Zagen’ ” 
works TBA by Stockhausen, Takemitsu 
free 
(804) 289-8980 
www.modlin.richmond.edu

Feb. 23 (8 p.m.) 
Old Cabell Hall, University of Virginia, Charlottesville 
Rivanna String Quartet 
Doris Lederer, viola 
Clyde Thomas Shaw, cello 
Beethoven: Quartet in E flat major, Op. 74 (“Harp”) 
Kurtág: “Twelve Microludes for String Quartet (Hommage à Mihaly Andras)”
Brahms: Sextet in G major, Op. 36
$15
free master class by Lederer and Shaw, 8 p.m. Feb. 22, Old Cabell Hall
www.music.virginia.edu

Feb. 23 (8 p.m.)
Kennedy Center Concert Hall, Washington 
Renée Fleming, soprano 
Olga Kern, piano 
works by Schumann, Rachmaninoff, Richard Strauss, others 
$45-$120 
(202) 785-9727 
www.wpas.org

Feb. 24 (8 p.m.)
Williamsburg Library Theatre, 515 Scotland St.
Chamber Music Society of Williamsburg: 
Hermes String Quartet 
Haydn: Quartet in D major, Op. 76, No. 3 
Debussy: Quartet in G major 
Schumann: Quartet in A minor, Op. 41, No. 1 
$15 (waiting list) 
(757) 229-0385 
www.chambermusicwilliamsburg.org

Feb. 24 (7:30 p.m.) 
Terrace Theater, Kennedy Center, Washington 
Opera Lafayette: 
Dominique Labelle, soprano 
Ryan Brown, violin 
Loretta O‘Sullivan, cello 
Andrew Appel, harpsichord 
“A Wink at the Past” 
works by J.S. Bach, Handel 
$55-$75 
(800) 444-1324
www.kennedy-center.org

Feb. 25 (7 p.m.)
Vlahcevic Concert Hall, Singleton Arts Center, Virginia Commonwealth University, Park Avenue at Harrison Street, Richmond
VCU Symphonic Wind Ensemble 
Terry L. Austin directing 
Gershwin: “Rhapsody in Blue” 
Yin Zheng, piano 
other works TBA 
free 
(804) 828-6776 
www.arts.vcu.edu/music

Feb. 26 (7 p.m.) 
Feb. 27 (8 p.m.) 
Feb. 28 (8 p.m.) 
Kennedy Center Concert Hall, Washington 
National Symphony Orchestra 
Herbert Blomstedt conducting 
Beethoven: Piano Concerto No. 3 in C minor 
Emanuel Ax, piano 
Beethoven: Symphony No. 3 in E flat major (“Eroica”) 
$10-$95 
(800) 444-1324 
www.kennedy-center.org

Feb. 27 (7:30 p.m.)
Grace Covenant Presbyterian Church, 1627 Monument Ave., Richmond
American Guild of Organists Repertoire Recital Series: 
Chelsea Chen, organ 
program TBA 
donation requested 
(804) 359-2463 
www.richmondago.org

Feb. 27 (8 p.m.)
Ferguson Arts Center, Christopher Newport University, Newport News 
Feb. 28 (8 p.m.) 
Chrysler Hall, 215 St. Paul’s Boulevard, Norfolk
March 1 (2:30 p.m.) 
Sandler Arts Center, 201 S. Market St., Virginia Beach 
Virginia Symphony 
JoAnn Falletta conducting 
Libby Larsen: “Four on the Floor” 
Dvorák: Cello Concerto in B minor 
Amit Peled, cello 
Copland: Symphony No. 3 
$25-$107 
(757) 892-6366 
www.virginiasymphony.org

Feb. 27 (8 p.m.) 
Brooks Hall, University of Virginia, Charlottesville 
Elizabeth Crone, flute 
Rick Masters, piano 
Valerie Coleman: work TBA (premiere)
Elizabeth Hoffman: work TBA (premiere)
works TBA by Martinu, Coleridge-Taylor, Florence Price, James Sochinski 
free 
(434) 924-3052 
www.music.virginia.edu

Feb. 28 (8 p.m.) 
Vlahcevic Concert Hall, Singleton Arts Center, Virginia Commonwealth University, Park Avenue at Harrison Street, Richmond 
Rennolds Chamber Concerts: 
Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center:
Wu Han, piano 
Daniel Hope, violin 
Paul Neubauer, viola 
David Finckel, cello 
Mahler: Piano Quartet in A minor 
Schumann: Piano Quartet in E flat major, Op. 47 
Brahms: Piano Quartet in G minor, Op. 25 
$34 
(804) 828-6776 
www.arts.vcu.edu/music

Feb. 28 (8 p.m.)
Carpenter Theatre, Richmond CenterStage, Sixth and Grace streets 
Richmond Symphony Pops 
Keitaro Harada conducting 
Wicked Divas 
Broadway show tunes TBA 
$10-$78 
(800) 514-3849 (ETIX) 
www.richmondsymphony.com

Feb. 28 (8 p.m.) 
Music Center at Strathmore, 5301 Tuckerman Lane, North Bethesda, MD 
Baltimore Symphony Orchestra 
Yan Pascal Tortelier conducting 
Berlioz: “Le Corsaire” Overture 
Ravel: Piano Trio in A minor 
Mozart: Piano Concerto No. 23 in A major, K. 488 
Louis Lortie, piano 
Stravinsky: “The Firebird” Suite 
$37-$99 
(877) 276-1444 (Baltimore Symphony box office) 
www.strathmore.org
4 months ago | |
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Twenty-five years have passed since JoAnn Falletta took over the Virginia Symphony as its music director.

Highlights of her career in Hampton Roads include the first visit engagement by a Virginia orchestra at New York's Carnegie Hall (in 1997), and performances of all the symphonies of Gustav Mahler, the biggest of which are rarely essayed by orchestras outside the major league.

Falletta, who is also music director of the Buffalo Philharmonic and a guest conductor with a worldwide itinerary, has become one of the most prominent female conductors, and is one of the most persuasive “mainstream” conductors in performing new or neglected music.

The 61-year-old Falletta looks back, and ahead, in an interview with Rashod Ollison of The Virginian-Pilot:

http://hamptonroads.com/2015/01/vso-conductor-enjoys-25-years-hampton-roads
4 months ago | |
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Mason Bates, the Richmond-bred composer whose works have been performed by many of this country’s leading orchestras and ensembles, has been named composer-in-residence of the Kennedy Center in Washington for a three-year period beginning in the 2015-16 season.

Bates, now in his sixth year as a composer-in-residence with the Chicago Symphony Orchestra, will compose works for various groups that perform at the Kennedy Center. Performing groups and series affiliated with the center include the National Symphony Orchestra, Washington National Opera, Kennedy Center Chamber Players and Fortas Chamber Music Series.

No specific commissions have been announced yet.

The 38-year-old composer, who doubles as a DJ in dance clubs and other spaces (in that guise, he’s known as DJ Masonic), also will curate a contemporary music series and work on various projects intended to enhance the Kennedy Center’s presence in the surrounding community.

An alumnus of Richmond’s St. Christopher’s School, Bates went on to study at New York’s Juilliard School and Columbia University, and subsequently earned his doctorate in composition at the University of California at Berkeley. John Corigliano and David Del Tredici were Bates’ principal composition teachers.

Now living near San Francisco, Bates is perhaps best known for works, such as “Rusty Air in Carolina” and “Liquid Interface,” that incorporate electronica (computer-generated electronic sounds) in symphonic orchestrations.

He also has written many chamber and orchestral works with standard instrumentation, including the Violin Concerto that Anne Akiko Meyers has performed with several orchestras, including the Richmond Symphony, since its premiere in 2012, and a Cello Concerto, recently introduced by Joshua Roman with the Seattle Symphony Orchestra.

In recent years, Bates’ music has been among the most frequently programmed of any living American composer’s.

The Washington Post’s Anne Midgette reports on Bates’ Kennedy Center appointment:

http://www.washingtonpost.com/news/style/wp/2015/01/28/kennedy-center-names-first-composer-in-residence/
5 months ago | |
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A grand tour of piano music in the 19th century, featuring one the preeminent virtuosos of the romantic era, Ferruccio Busoni, playing his transcription of the Chaconne from J.S. Bach’s Partita in D minor, and performances on early concert grands built by Érard and Chickering – plus, a royal visitation by Prince Louis Ferdinand of Prussia, the most musically gifted blue-blood in European history, a pianist and composer much admired by Beethoven and Schumann.

Jan. 29
11 a.m.-2 p.m. EST
1600-1900 UTC/GMT
WDCE, University of Richmond
90.1 FM
www.wdce.org

Chopin: Scherzo in B minor, Op. 20
Alexander Paley, piano (Blüthner)

Chopin: Ballade in G minor, Op. 23
Bella Davidovich, piano (Newton Classics)

Grieg: “Lyric Pieces” – 
“Cradle Song,” Op. 68, No. 5
“Wedding Day at Troldhaugen,” Op. 65, No. 6
“Evening in the Mountains,” Op. 68, No. 4
Leif Ove Andsnes, piano (EMI Classics)

Past Masters:
Bach: Partita No. 2 in D minor, BWV 1004 – Chaconne
(transcription by Ferruccio Busoni)
Ferruccio Busoni,
Duo-Art piano roll
(Nimbus)
(first issued 1925)

Schumann: “Fantasiestücke”
Marc-André Hamelin, piano (Hyperion)

Beethoven: Piano Concerto
No. 3 in C minor
Fazil Say, piano
Frankfurt Radio Symphony Orchestra/
Gianandrea Noseda (Naïve)

Prince Louis Ferdinand of Prussia: Piano Quartet
in F minor, Op. 6
Horst Göbel, piano
Camerata Quartet members (Thorofon)

Liszt: “Les Années de Pèlerinage” (Book 1: Switzerland) – 
“Vallée d’Obermann”
Carole Carniel, piano (Érard, 1840)
(Ligia)

Louis Moreau Gottschalk: “La Brise (Valse de Concert)”
Lambert Orkis, piano (Chickering, 1865)
(Smithsonian Institution)
5 months ago | |
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with Michael Tree, viola
Jan. 25, University of Richmond

This season’s visit by the Shanghai Quartet to the University of Richmond, played to near-full house in the Modlin Arts Center’s Camp Concert Hall, proved to be meatier, both in content and execution, than most of the programs that the ensemble has presented here in recent years.

This program was framed by two works of near-epic proportions: Beethoven’s Quartet in E flat major, Op. 127, and Brahms’ Quintet in F major, Op. 88, the latter with Michael Tree, formerly of the Guarneri Quartet, playing second viola.

The first, and in some ways the most elusive, of Beethoven’s late quartets, Op. 127 is at times as tumultuous as the composer’s most in-your-face orchestral music, and at other times rarified to the point of other-worldiness. These two modes of expression sometimes coexist in uneasy proximity, notably in the finale. Throughout the work, string sound see-saws from highly refined to earthy, even (ideally) gritty.

The Shanghai rode this musical bronco mostly in the saddle (there were a couple of minor spills), and with considerable assertiveness. The foursome – violinists Weigang Li and Yi-Wen Jiang, violist Honggang Li and cellist Nicholas Tzavaras – produced a robust collective sound, rooted in Tzavaras’ massively sonorous bass lines, that served to heighten contrasts with quieter or more finely drawn passages.

Their one interpretive misstep in the Beethoven was a scherzo whose tempo was so speedy that string figurations inevitably sounded smeared. 

The Brahms quintet, while not as long as the Beethoven, is at least as grand-scaled. Its opening allegro is one of the longest movements that Brahms composed, all but daring interpreters to maintain continuity through an eventful but rather meandering development section. Its slow movement, a soulfully lyrical adagio interrupted twice by a trio section from a missing scherzo, may be the most episodic music of the mature Brahms.

The Shanghai and Tree – he playing what must be one of the largest violas in captivity – rose to Brahms’ various challenges in a performance of enveloping warmth and carefully calibrated passion.

Between those two behemoths, the Shanghai reprised one of its mainstay miniatures, Joaquín Turina’s “La oración del torero” (“The Toreador’s Prayer”), colorful and cannily dramatized music that the group played with spontaneity and go-for-broke expressiveness, but without a hint of coarseness.
5 months ago | |
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Jan. 24, Virginia Commonwealth University

Rachel Barton Pine’s performance in VCU’s Rennolds Chamber Music Series series was as much a reunion with an old friend as it was a violin recital. (Of course, not many old friends come calling with a 1742 Guarneri in hand.)

In her fifth appearance here since 1999, Pine ranged pretty widely across the repertory, from Prokofiev’s Sonata No. 1 in F minor, a stark and portentous evocation of wartime violence and suffering, to Antonio Bazzini’s comically frenzied “Dance of the Goblins.” The 40-year-old, Chicago-born violinist also was a personable and informative tour guide in her comments between selections.

Pianist Matthew Hagle was a more than supportive accompanist, adding depth and atmosphere to the Prokofiev and a full palette of tone color to Franck’s Sonata in A major and a set of lullabies.

The Franck was the program’s musical highlight. Pine essayed this familiar sonata with authority and sensitivity to French high-romantic style and expressive rhetoric. She also summoned the richest array of tone and color from her violin in this piece.

The instrument’s subtler qualities were not much called for in the Prokofiev sonata (except in its muted “wind in the graveyard” effects) or in Schubert’s Duo in A major, and the fiddle’s brilliance at high volume was not showcased in the lullabies.

Pine began collecting lullabies for violin after the birth of her daughter; she’s up to about 150 by now. The pieces she chose for this program – Brahms’ familiar “Wegenlied” in Albert Spalding’s arrangement, Eugène Ysaÿe’s “Rêve d’Enfant” (“Child’s Dream”), Rebecca Clarke’s Lullaby (1918) and “Mother and Child” from William Grant Still’s Suite for violin and piano (1943) – were, for the most part, moodily wistful in expression and nuanced in voicing.

Two of Pine’s selections were directly linked to her Guarneri. The instrument was formerly owned by one of the first women to achieve prominence as a violinist, Marie Soldat-Roeger (1863-1955), who performed for and with Brahms; and earlier by Bazzini, who may well have devised the tonal and technical pyrotechnics of “Dance of the Goblins” on this fiddle.
5 months ago | |
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The New York Times’ Michael Cooper reports on the ongoing bidding war for the remaining assets of the now-defunct New York City Opera – principally, it seems, the company’s name and stellar history. Two bidders offer $1.25 million and $1.5 million. Questions arise about both:

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/01/21/nyregion/potential-buyers-of-new-york-city-opera-hold-a-bidding-war-in-court.html
5 months ago | |
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A new Hamburg Steinway concert grand piano is scheduled for delivery to the University of Richmond this week. It is believed to be the first instrument by the German maker that will be in regular use in a Richmond concert venue.

The piano, which cost $213,196, was purchased with funds from the university’s dean of arts and sciences.

“The tone of the Hamburg was well suited to Camp Concert Hall” in the Modlin Arts Center, says Jeffrey Riehl, interim chair of the UR music department. He characterizes the piano’s tone as “clear, resonant, and ringing[,] with an excellent balance between the bass and treble,” adding that its sound is compatible with that of an American-made Steinway already owned by the university.

Faculty pianists Richard Becker and Joanne Kong, members of a piano selection committee, “had sterling experiences with Hamburgs in the past that made them quite eager to have one,” Riehl says. The group also wanted performers to have an alternative to a Steinway D, the concert grand in widest use in major U.S. concert halls.

Another consideration was the contractual obligation of many touring pianists to perform on Steinways.

While the Hamburg Steinway will be new to the Richmond concert scene, audiences in the area have had considerable exposure to other German-made pianos. Bon Air Presbyterian Church owns a Bechstein, which has been used regularly in concerts by the Richmond Chamber Players, Chamber Music Society of Central Virginia and other performers. Alexander Paley frequently plays a Blüthner piano in his Richmond festival.

UR’s Hamburg Steinway is scheduled for its public christening in a recital by Becker at 3 p.m. Feb. 1 – assuming, Riehl says, that the pianist believes the instrument has “settled in enough” in its new environment. It also will be played in recitals by Paul Hanson, 7:30 p.m. Feb. 23; Barry Hannigan, 7:30 p.m. March 2; and by Kong in a trio performance with violinist Daisuke Yamamoto and cellist Neal Cary, 7:30 p.m. March 23. All four will be in Camp Concert Hall, without admission charge.

It’s not known whether Hélène Grimaud, the celebrated French pianist performing in a ticketed Modlin Arts Presents program at 7:30 p.m. April 22, will choose to play the instrument.
5 months ago | |
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