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“The Flower of England: from the Empire through the Wars” is the theme of this year’s Richmond Symphony Summer Series, running from July 13 to Aug. 17 at Dominion Arts Center.

Six chamber concerts lasting about an hour will be staged on Thursday evenings in the fourth season of the series, presented by the symphony in association with Virginia Commonwealth University and the University of Richmond. Members of the orchestra will perform with VCU and UR faculty musicians; the Aug. 3 program also will feature faculty from VCU’s Global Summer Institute of Music.

The concerts, at 6:30 p.m. in the Gottwald Playhouse of Dominion Arts Center, Sixth and Grace streets, will mix works by familiar names from English music – Elgar, Vaughan Williams, Holst, Britten, Delius – with pieces by less frequently heard composers of the 19th and 20th centuries, such as Charles Villiers Stanford, Samuel Coleridge-Taylor, Frank Bridge, Arnold Bax, John Ireland and Eugene Goosens.

Subscription ticket prices for six concerts are $81 for adults, $60 for youths (18 and younger) and college students. Sampler subscriptions – three or more concerts at $16 each for adults, $11 each for youths and students – also are offered. Single tickets, which go on sale on May 8, are $18 for adults, $12 for youths and students.

Most concerts in past series have sold out in advance.

For more information, call the Richmond Symphony patron services desk at (804) 788-1212 or visit http://www.richmondsymphony.com

“The Flower of England” artists and programs:

July 13
Adrian Pintea, violin
Russell Wilson, piano
Vaughan Williams: “The Lark Ascending” (arr. for violin and piano)
Britten: Suite for violin and piano, Op. 6
Coleridge-Taylor: “Petite suite de concert,” Op. 77
Elgar: “Salut d’amour,” Op. 12

July 20
Susannah Klein, violin
Joanne Kong, piano
Elgar: Violin Sonata in E minor, Op. 82
Bridge: “Norse Legend,” “Amaryllis,” “Souvenir,” “Heart’s Ease”
Ireland: “Summer Evening”
Thomas Pitfield: Violin Sonata in A major – Allegretto articulato and Scherzo

July 27
Schuyler Slack, cello
David Fisk, piano
Bridge: “Four Pieces”
Bax: “Folk Tale”
Delius: Romance for cello and piano
Bridge: Cello Sonata in D minor

Aug. 3
Zachary Guiles, trombone
Yin Zheng, piano
Pascale Delache-Feldman, double-bass
Aleksandr Haskin, flute and piccolo
Elgar (arr. Sauer): “Chanson de nuit,” “Chanson de matin”
Holst: Concertante
Elgar: Duetto for double-bass and trombone
Elgar: “Salut d’amour” for trombone, piano and double-bass
Goosens: “Five Impressions of a Holiday” for flute, trombone and piano
Vaughan Williams: “Suite de ballet” for flute and piano
Ian Clarke: “The Great Train Race,” “Zoom Tube” for solo flute
Britten: “Ploughboy” for trombone, piano and piccolo

Aug. 10
David Lemelin, clarinet
Magdalena Adamek, piano
Gerald Finzi: “Five Bagatelles,” Op. 23
Charles Villiers Stanford: Clarinet Sonata, Op. 129
Bridge: “Three Miniature Pastorales”
Joseph Horowitz: Sonatina

Aug. 17
Shawn Welk, oboe & English horn
Richard Becker, piano
Britten: “Six Metamorphoses after Ovid” – “Pan,” “Arethusa”
Edmund Rubbra: Oboe Sonata in C major, Op. 100
Tobias Matthay: “Three Lyric Studies” for piano
Vaughan Williams (arr. Stanton): “Six Studies in English Folk-Song” for English horn and piano
Thomas F. Dunhill: “Three Short Pieces,” Op. 81
Goosens: “Concerto in One Movement,” Op. 45 (arr. for oboe and piano)
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Johannes Brahms, master of the art of variation: His piano variations on themes by Handel, Haydn, Paganini and Schumann, played alongside their sources; his rarely heard “13 Variations on a Hungarian Song,” played alongside a set of his familiar Hungarian dances; and, to conclude, his most famous variation on a theme – the
old collegiate drinking song “Gaudeamus Igitur” – in the “Academic Festival” Overture.

April 5
noon-3 p.m. EST
1700-2000 UTC/GMT
WDCE, University of Richmond
90.1 FM
http://www.wdce.org

Brahms: Hungarian dances –
No. 3 in F major
No. 4 in F minor
No. 5 in F sharp minor
(orchestrations by Marc-Olivier Dupin,
based on arrangements by Joseph Joachim)
Patrice Fontanarosa, violin
Jan Talich
Chamber Orchestra
(EMI Classics)

Brahms:
“13 Variations on a Hungarian Song,”
Op. 21, No. 2
Andreas Bach, piano
(Oehms Classics)

Handel:
Suite in B flat major, HWV 434
Shai Wosner, piano
(Onyx)

Brahms: “Variations on a Theme by Handel,” Op. 24
Shai Wosner, piano
(Onyx)

Paganini:
Caprice in A minor,
Op. 1, No. 24
Midori, violin
(Sony Classical)

Brahms:
“Variations on a
Theme of Paganini,”
Op. 35 – Books 1 & 2
(selections)
Yuja Wang, piano
(Deutsche Grammophon)

Past Masters:
Paganini: Violin Concerto No. 2 in B minor
(“La campanella”)
Ivry Gitlis, violin
Warsaw National Philharmonic/Stanislaw Wislocki
(recorded 1966)
(Philips)

Brahms:
Capriccio in B minor,
Op. 76, No. 2
Ivan Moravec, piano
(Supraphon)

Schumann:
“Bunte blätter,”
Op. 99, No. 4
Louis Lortie, piano
(Chandos)

Brahms: “Variations on a Theme of Schumann,” Op. 9
Louis Lortie, piano
(Chandos)

Haydn (attr.):
Octet (Partita)
in B flat major,
Hob. II:46
Consortium Classicum
(Warner Classics)

Brahms:
“Variations on a Theme
by Haydn,” Op. 56
Martha Argerich & Nelson Freire, pianos
(Deutsche Grammophon)

Brahms: “Academic Festival” Overture
Gewandhaus Orchestra, Leipzig/Riccardo Chailly
(Decca)
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Joshua Roman, cello
Andrius Žlabys, piano
April 1, Virginia Commonwealth University

Solo recitalists typically receive boldface billing, with their accompanists in secondary font. Not so in the weekend’s performance by Joshua Roman, the widely lauded young American cellist, and his longtime recital partner, the Lithuanian-born pianist Andrius Žlabys, in Virginia Commonwealth University’s Rennolds Chamber Concerts series.

Roman, whose focused, singing tone sounded perfectly suited to music ranging from Debussy and Beethoven to Janácek and Arvo Pärt, certainly rated star billing; but so did Žlabys, who has been performing with Roman since they were studying at the Cleveland Institute of Music and has built his own career as a solo pianist.

A few measures into Debussy’s Sonata for cello and piano, which opened the program, it was clear that this would be an evening of deeply collaborative music-making. Žlabys proved to be the rare accompanist who, while always supportive, also creates and constructively inhabits his own musical space.

This was especially satisfying in Beethoven’s Sonata in A major, Op. 69, in which cello and piano are equal, consistently complementary voices. The sonata’s central scherzo, in which the piano plays a nearly orchestral role, found Roman and Žlabys at their collaborative best, feeding off each other’s energy and expressiveness in playful exchanges.

The duo’s phrasing and sensitivity to tone coloration brought contour and continuity to Janácek‘s “Pohádka” (“Fairy Tale”), emphasizing the folk-derived melodies and moderating the sometimes grating sonorities that characterize this early modern Czech composer’s style.

Roman and Žlabys made unusually lyrical work of the Debussy sonata, fleshing out the skeletal quality of this piece from late in the composer’s life, but without quite romanticizing it. The cellist crossed that line with vibrato-heavy lyricism in “Louange à l’Eternité de Jesus” (“Praise to the immortality of Jesus”) from Olivier Messiaen’s “Quartet for the End of Time.”

The two musicians traced the long narrative and expressive arc of Pärt’s “Fratres” (“Brothers”), a quasi-minimalist piece that has gone through 17 (!) instrumental iterations since its original 1980 version for violin and piano. It sounded warmer, naturally, when played on cello, and Roman’s austere voicing of his part left more space for the piano’s partly supportive, partly contrasting voice.

Roman and Žlabys have been improvising – “noodling,” as the cellist put it – since their student days, but had not done so in public before this concert. Their “Only Once” improvisation suggested extensive exposure to impressionistic jazz by the likes of Pat Metheny and Bill Evans.

Astor Piazzolla’s “Grand Tango,” the climax of the program, was a virtuoso exercise for both players.
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Mason Bates, the Richmond-bred composer of symphonic works combining traditional instruments with electronica – sounds generated on and played back through a laptop computer – performs his “Alternative Energy” with Yannick Nézet-Séguin conducting the Philadelphia Orchestra on April 6-8.

In this and other works, the 40-year-old Bates, currently conducting a performance and curation residency at the Kennedy Center in Washington, seeks to make “music that’s fresh and inevitable. If it has both of those things, it can still surprise you,” he tells the Philadelphia Inquirer’s David Patrick Stearns:

http://www.philly.com/philly/entertainment/arts/417489783.html

Bates, who in recent years has become one of the most frequently performed living US composers, will introduce his “The (R)evolution of Steve Jobs” at the Santa Fe Opera this summer. He is at work on an as-yet untitled choral-orchestral work to be introduced in May 2018 by the Richmond Symphony and Symphony Chorus.
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Classical performances in and around Richmond, with selected events elsewhere in Virginia and the Washington area. Program information, provided by presenters, is updated as details become available. Adult single-ticket prices are listed; senior, student/youth, group and other discounts may be offered.

* In and around Richmond: Joshua Roman, one of the leading young American cellists, and pianist Andrius Žlabys play Debussy, Beethoven, Messiaen, Janácek, Arvo Pärt and Astor Piazzolla in a Rennolds Chamber Concerts program, April 1 at Singleton Arts Center of Virginia Commonwealth University. . . . Virginia Opera concludes its current season with a performance of Puccini’s “Turandot,” starring soprano Kelly Cae Hogan in the title role and tenor Derek Taylor as Calaf, April 2 at the Carpenter Theatre of Dominion Arts Center. . . . Organist Bruce Stevens plays works by Bach, Mozart, Josef Rheinberger and Domenico Zipoli in a free recital, April 3 at the University of Richmond’s Cannon Memorial Chapel. . . . Alexander Kordzaia conducts the UR Symphony Orchestra in the premiere of Allen Wittig’s “In Tribute,” in a free program also featuring Saint-Saëns’ “Organ” Symphony (No. 3), April 5 at UR’s Modlin Arts Center. . . . The Richmond Symphony and Symphony Chorus, Steven Smith conducting, are joined by soprano Michelle Areyzaga and bass-baritone Kevin Deas, in Vaughan Williams’ “Dona nobis pacem” and Bruckner’s Psalm 150, with Schubert’s “Unfinished” Symphony opening the program, April 8-9 at Dominion Arts Center. . . . The Klemperer Trio – violinist Erika Klemperer, cellist (and UR President) Ronald Crutcher and pianist Gordon Back – play Shostakovich, Mendelssohn and Arensky on April 12 at the Modlin Center. . . . The Takács Quarter returns for an all-Beethoven program, April 20 at the Modlin Center. . . . The Chamber Music Society of Central Virginia presents a free program “Paris in Words and Music,” April 22 in the Gellman Room of the Richmond Public Library’s downtown main branch, and a ticketed program of works by Franck, Saint-Saëns, Fauré and Vincent D’Indy, April 23 in UR’s Perkinson Recital Hall. . . . The Richmond Symphony plays Handel, Stravinsky, Beethoven and Mozart in a Rush Hour casual concert, conducted by Steven Smith, April 27 at Hardywood Park Craft Brewery, and a Metro Collection concert led by the orchestra’s associate conductor, Chia-Hsuan Lin, April 30 at Randolph-Macon College in Ashland. . . . The Richmond Symphony Chorus, led by Erin R. Freeman, remembers its founding director, James Erb, in a program of Brahms, Lassus and folk-song arrangements by Erb, April 28 at Second Baptist Church. . . . VCU Opera stages a double bill of Puccini one-acts, “Suor Angelica” and “Gianni Schicchi,” April 28 and 30 at Singleton Arts Center. . . . David Higgs plays Liszt, Karg-Elert, Dupré, Duruflé and more in the season finale of the Repertoire Recital Series of the Richmond chapter, American Guild of Organists, April 30 at River Road Church, Baptist.

* Noteworthy elsewhere: The New York-based chamber orchestra The Knights, joined by the San Francisco Girls Chorus and vocalist Christina Courtin, perform in the final program of SHIFT: a Festival of American Orchestras, April 1 at the Kennedy Center in Washington. . . . The Escher String Quartet plays Beethoven, Debussy and Webern, April 3 at the Chrysler Museum of Art in Norfolk, April 4 at the Williamsburg Library Theatre. . . . Pianist Paul Lewis plays Bach, Beethoven, Chopin and Weber, April 4 at Old Cabell Hall of the University of Virginia in Charlottesville. . . . Pianist Daniil Trifonov plays Schumann, Shostakovich and Stravinsky, April 4 at Washington’s Kennedy Center. . . . Countertentor David Daniels and cellist Michael Daniels join JoAnn Falletta and the Virginia Symphony in Kenneth Fuchs’ “Poems of Life,” on a program also featuring Tchaikovsky’s Fifth Symphony and Charles Tomlinson Griffes’ “The Pleasure Dome of Kubla Khan,” April 7-9 at venues in Newport News, Norfolk and Virginia Beach. . . . Violinist Anne-Sophie Mutter and pianist Lambert Orkis play works by Mozart, Respighi, Saint-Saëns and Sebastian Currier, April 8 at the Kennedy Center. . . . Violinist Itzhak Perlman plays film scores for violin with the Virginia Symphony, April 13 at Sandler Arts Center in Virginia Beach. . . . Eric Owens, the stellar American bass-baritone, sings Mozart, Schubert, Brahms, Ravel and more, April 15 at the Paramount Theater in Charlottesville. . . . Kate Tamarkin, longtime conductor of the Charlottesville Symphony at the University of Virginia, leads her farewell concerts with the ensemble, with works of Wagner and Elgar and Anne-Marie McDermott playing Beethoven’s Piano Concerto No. 4, April 22 at UVa’s Old Cabell Hall and April 23 at Charlottesville High School.
. . . Pianist Yefim Bronfman plays works by Bartók, Schumann, Debussy and Stravinsky, April 25 at the University of the District of Columbia in Washington. . . . Opera Roanoke stages Carlisle Floyd’s “Susannah,” April 28 and 30 at the Jefferson Center.


April 1 (8 p.m.)
Vlahcevic Concert Hall, Singleton Arts Center, Virginia Commonwealth University, Park Avenue at Harrison Street, Richmond
Rennolds Chamber Concerts:
Joshua Roman, cello
Andrius Žlabys, piano
Debussy: Cello Sonata
Beethoven: Sonata in A major, Op. 69
Roman-Žlabys: “Only Once, an Improvisation”
Messiaen: “Louange a l’eternite de Jesus”
Janácek: “Pohadka”
Arvo Pärt: “Fratres”
Astor Piazzolla: “Grand Tango”
$34
(804) 828-6776
http://arts.vcu.edu/music/events/

April 1 (8 p.m.)
Kennedy Center Concert Hall, Washington
SHIFT: a Festival of American Orchestras:
The Knights
Eric Jacobsen conducting
San Francisco Girls Chorus
Christina Courtin, vocalist
Brahms: Psalm 13, Op. 27
Lisa Bielawa: “My Outstretched Hand”
Aaron Jay Kernis: “Remembering the Sea”
Vivaldi: “Gloria in D major
The Knights: “. . . the ground beneath our feet” (excerpts)
$25
(800) 444-1324
http://www.kennedy-center.org

April 1 (8 p.m.)
Music Center at Strathmore, 5301 Tuckerman Lane, North Bethesda, MD
National Philharmonic
Piotr Gajewski conducting
Mozart: “A Musical Joke”
Mozart: Piano Concerto No. 23 in A major, K. 488
Eric Lu, piano
Mozart: Symphony No. 40 in G minor, K. 550
$48-$88
(301) 581-5100
http://www.strathmore.org

April 2 (2:30 p.m.)
Carpenter Theatre, Dominion Arts Center, Sixth and Grace streets, Richmond
Virginia Opera
John DeMain conducting
Puccini: “Turandot”
Kelly Cae Hogan (Turandot)
Derek Taylor (Calaf)
Ricardo Lugo (Timur)
Danielle Pastin (Liù)
Keith Brown (Ping)
Ian McEuen (Pang)
Joseph Gaines (Pong)
John McGuire (Emperor)
Andrew Paulson (Mandarin)
Lillian Groag, stage director
in Italian, English captions
$40-$124
(866) 673-7282
http://vaopera.org

April 2 (3 p.m.)
Ferguson Arts Center, Christopher Newport University, Newport News
Piano Battle (Andreas Kern & Paul Cibis, pianos)
“Combat on the Keys – Classical Smackdown”
program TBA
$25-$47
(757) 594-8752
http://fergusoncenter.org

April 2 (3 p.m.)
Music Center at Strathmore, 5301 Tuckerman Lane, North Bethesda, MD
Baltimore Symphony Orchestra
Marin Alsop conducting
Barber: Adagio for strings
Steven Mackey: “Beautiful Passing”
Jennifer Koh, violin
Rimsky-Korsakov: “Scheherazade”
$35-$105
(877) 276-1444 (Baltimore Symphony box office)
http://www.strathmore.org

April 3 (7:30 p.m.)
Cannon Memorial Chapel, University of Richmond
Bruce Stevens, organ
anon.: 9 Renaissance dances
Domenico Zipoli: “Sonate d’Intavolatura”
J.S. Bach: Prelude and Fugue in B minor, BWV 544
J.S. Bach: “Orgel-Büchlein” – five chorale preludes
Josef Rheinberger: Sonata 11 in D flat major, op. 154 – Pastorale
Mozart: Fantasia in F minor, K.608
free
(804) 289-8980
http://modlin.richmond.edu

April 3 (7:30 p.m.)
Chrysler Museum of Arts, 1 Memorial Place, Norfolk
Feldman Chamber Music Series:
Escher String Quartet
Beethoven: Quartet in E flat major, Op. 127
Webern: “Five Pieces,” Op. 5
Debussy: Quartet in G minor
$30
(757) 552-1630
http://feldmanchambermusic.org

April 4 (7:30 p.m.)
Vlahcevic Concert Hall, Singleton Arts Center, Virginia Commonwealth University, Park Avenue at Harrison Street, Richmond
VCU Women’s Choir & Vocal Ensembles
program TBA
$10
(804) 828-6776
http://arts.vcu.edu/music/events/

April 4 (8 p.m.)
Williamsburg Library Theatre, 515 Scotland St.
Chamber Music Society of Williamsburg:
Escher String Quartet
Beethoven: Quartet in E flat major, Op. 127
Webern: “Five Pieces,” Op. 5
Debussy: Quartet in G minor
$15 (waiting list)
(757) 220-0051
http://chambermusicwilliamsburg.org

April 4 (7:30 p.m.)
Old Cabell Hall, University of Virginia, Charlottesville
Tuesday Evening Concerts:
Paul Lewis, piano
J.S. Bach: Partita No. 1 in B flat major, BWV 825
Beethoven: Sonata in E flat major, Op. 7
Chopin: Waltz in A minor Op. 34, No. 2
Chopin: Waltz in F minor Op. 70, No. 2
Chopin: Waltz in D flat major, Op. 64, No. 1
Weber: Sonata No. 2 in A flat major, Op. 39
$12-$35
(434) 924-3376
http://tecs.org

April 4 (8 p.m.)
Kennedy Center Concert Hall, Washington
Daniil Trifonov, piano
Schumann: “Kinderszenen,” Op. 15
Schumann: Toccata, Op. 7
Schumann: “Kreisleriana,” Op. 16
Shostakovich: 24 preludes and fugues, Op. 87 (selections)
Stravinsky: “Three Movements from ‘Petrouchka’ ”
$30-$110
(202) 785-9727
http://washingtonperformingarts.org

April 5 (7:30 p.m.)
Camp Concert Hall, Modlin Arts Center, University of Richmond
UR Symphony Orchestra
Alexander Kordzaia conducting
Allen Wittig: “In Tribute” (premiere)
Saint-Saëns: Symphony No. 3 in C minor (“Organ”)
organist TBA
free
(804) 289-8980
http://modlin.richmond.edu

April 5 (1 p.m.)
St. Bede Catholic Church, 3686 Ironbound Road, Williamsburg
Steven Lianos, organ
works TBA by J.S. Bach, Vivaldi
free
(757) 229-3631
http://www.bedeva.org/concerts

April 6 (5:30 p.m.)
Vlahcevic Concert Hall, Singleton Arts Center, Virginia Commonwealth University, Park Avenue at Harrison Street, Richmond
Andy Harnsberger, percussion
program TBA
free
(804) 828-6776
http://arts.vcu.edu/music/events/

April 6 (7 p.m.)
April 7 (8 p.m.) 
April 8 (8 p.m.)
Kennedy Center Concert Hall, Washington
National Symphony Orchestra
James Conlon conducting
Shostakovich: Symphony No. 5
Britten: “Peter Grimes” – “Four Sea Interludes”
Prokofiev: Piano Concerto No. 1 in D flat major
Lisa de la Salle, piano
$15-$89
(800) 444-1324
http://www.kennedy-center.org

April 6 (8 p.m.)
Music Center at Strathmore, 5301 Tuckerman Lane, North Bethesda, MD
Baltimore Symphony Orchestra
Ludovic Morlot conducting
Paganini: Violin Concerto No. 1 in D major 
Ray Chen, violin
Berlioz: “Symphonie fantastique”
$35-$99
(877) 276-1444 (Baltimore Symphony box office)
http://www.strathmore.org

April 7 (8 p.m.)
Ferguson Arts Center, Christopher Newport University, Newport News
April 8 (8 p.m.)
Chrysler Hall, 215 St. Paul’s Boulevard, Norfolk
April 9 (2:30 p.m.)
Sandler Arts Center, 201 S. Market St., Virginia Beach
Virginia Symphony
JoAnn Falletta conducting
Charles Tomlinson Griffes: “The Pleasure Dome of Kubla Khan”
Kenneth Fuchs: “Poems of Life”
David Daniels, countertenor
Michael Daniels, cello
Tchaikovsky: Symphony No. 5 in E minor
$25-$110
(757) 892-6366
http://www.virginiasymphony.org

April 7 (8 p.m.)
Old Cabell Hall, University of Virginia, Charlottesville
UVa University Singers
Michael Slon directing
“Music of African-American Composers”
Nathaniel Dett: “Listen to the Lambs”
works and spiritual arrangements by Moses Hogan, William Dawson, others
$15
(434) 924-3376
http://music.virginia.edu/events

April 7 (7:30 p.m.)
Salem Civic Center, 1001 Roanoke Boulevard
Roanoke Symphony Pops
David Stewart Wiley conducting
Classical Mystery Tour, guest stars
“Music of The Beatles”
$32-$53
(540) 343-9127
http://rso.com

April 8 (2 p.m.)
Gellman Room, Richmond Public Library, First and Franklin streets
Acadelt Enemble
(Erin Stuhlman, soprano; Louise Gallagher, alto; Christopher Ahart, tenor; Seth Roberts, bass)
“Songs of Love and Strife”
motets by Palestrina, Victoria, Anero
free
(804) 646-7223
http://www.richmondpubliclibrary.org

April 8 (8 p.m.)
April 9 (3 p.m.)
Carpenter Theatre, Dominion Arts Center, Sixth and Grace streets, Richmond
Richmond Symphony
Steven Smith conducting
Schubert: Symphony No. 8 in B minor (“Unfinished”)
Bruckner: Psalm 150
Vaughan Williams: “Dona nobis pacem”
Michelle Areyzaga, soprano
Kevin Deas, bass-baritone
Richmond Symphony Chorus
$10-$80
(800) 514-3849 (ETIX)
http://www.richmondsymphony.com

April 8 (3 p.m.)
Kennedy Center Concert Hall, Washington
Anne-Sophie Mutter, violin
Lambert Orkis, piano
Sebastian Currier: “Clockwork”
Mozart: Sonata in A major, K. 526
Respighi: Sonata in B minor
Saint-Saëns: “Introduction and Rondo capriccioso”
$30-$95
(202) 785-9727
http://washingtonperformingarts.org

April 9 (3 p.m.)
Camp Concert Hall, Modlin Arts Center, University of Richmond
UR Schola Cantorum & Women’s Chorale
Jeffrey Riehl & David Pedersen directing
Kodály: sacred and secular works TBA
free
(804) 289-8980
http://modlin.richmond.edu

April 12 (7:30 p.m.)
Camp Concert Hall, Modlin Arts Center, University of Richmond
Klemperer Trio
Shostakovich: Piano Trio in C minor, Op. 8
Mendelssohn: Piano Trio in D minor, Op. 49
Arensky: Piano Trio in D minor, Op. 32
free; tickets required
(804) 289-8980
http://modlin.richmond.edu

April 13 (7:30 p.m.)
Sandler Arts Center, 201 S. Market St., Virginia Beach
Itzhak Perlman, violin
Virginia Symphony
JoAnn Falletta conducting
“The Great Violin Film Scores”
$66.75-$125
(757) 892-6366
http://www.virginiasymphony.org

April 13 (8 p.m.)
Old Cabell Hall, University of Virginia, Charlottesville
UVa New Music Ensemble
I-Jen Fang directing
Cornelius Cardew: “Treatise”
Jon Bellona: “Immaterial Vamp”
free
(434) 924-3376
http://music.virginia.edu/events

April 15 (8 p.m.)
Paramount Theater, 215 E. Main St., Charlottesville
Eric Owens, bass-baritone
Craig Terry, piano
songs by Mozart, Schubert, Brahms, Ravel, Kurt Weill, Cole Porter, others
$29.75-$74.75
(434) 979-1333
http://www.theparamount.net

April 17 (7:30 p.m.)
Camp Concert Hall, Modlin Arts Center, University of Richmond
UR Chamber Ensembles
program TBA
free
(804) 289-8980
http://modlin.richmond.edu

April 18 (7:30 p.m.)
Vlahcevic Concert Hall, Singleton Arts Center, Virginia Commonwealth University, Park Avenue at Harrison Street, Richmond
Commonwealth Singers
VCU Choral Arts Society
Erin Freeman directing
program TBA
$10
(804) 828-6776
http://arts.vcu.edu/music/events/

April 19 (7 p.m.)
Vlahcevic Concert Hall, Singleton Arts Center, Virginia Commonwealth University, Park Avenue at Harrison Street, Richmond
VCU Symphonic Wind Ensemble
Terry Austin directing
program TBA
$10
(804) 828-6776
http://arts.vcu.edu/music/events/

April 20 (7:30 p.m.)
Camp Concert Hall, Modlin Arts Center, University of Richmond
Takács Quartet
Beethoven: Quartet in B flat major, Op. 18, No. 6
Beethoven: Quartet in C major, Op. 59, No. 3
Beethoven: Quartet in F major, Op. 135
$38
(804) 289-8980
http://modlin.richmond.edu

April 20 (7 p.m.)
April 22 (8 p.m.)
Kennedy Center Concert Hall, Washington
National Symphony Orchestra
Cristian Macelaru conducting
Beethoven: Violin Concerto in D major
Sergey Khachatryan, violin
Sibelius: “The Oceanides”
Smetana: “Vltava” (“The Moldau”)
Mason Bates: “Liquid Interface”
$15-$99
(800) 444-1324
http://www.kennedy-center.org

April 20 (8 p.m.)
Music Center at Strathmore, 5301 Tuckerman Lane, North Bethesda, MD
Baltimore Symphony Orchestra Pops
Jack Everly conducting
The Doo Wop Project, guest stars
$35-$99
(877) 276-1444 (Baltimore Symphony box office)
http://www.strathmore.org

April 21 (9 p.m.)
Kennedy Center Concert Hall, Washington
National Symphony Orchestra
Cristian Macelaru conducting
Zakir Hussain, tabla
Rahul Sharma, santoor
“DECLASSIFIED”
Hussain: “Peshkar”
world-music selections TBA
dance party with DJ Rekha and video mix by
Robin Bell, 10:15 p.m.
$39
(800) 444-1324
http://www.kennedy-center.org

April 22 (2 p.m.)
Gellman Room, Richmond Public Library, First and Franklin streets
Chamber Music Society of Central Virginia:
Diana Cohen & Daisuke Yamamoto, violins
Amadi Azikiwe, viola
James Wilson, cello
Mary Boodell, flute
Roman Rabinovich, piano
Anthony Smith, narrator
Angela Lehman, script writer
“Paris in Words and Music”
works TBA
free
(804) 646-7223
http://cmscva.org

April 22 (3:30 p.m.)
Old Cabell Hall, University of Virginia, Charlottesville
Virginia Women’s Chorus
Katherine Mitchell directing
“Earth Day Concert: Our Earth Is a Garden”
Native American and folk-song arrangements TBA
$15
(434) 924-3376
http://music.virginia.edu/events

April 22 (8 p.m.)
Old Cabell Hall, University of Virginia, Charlottesville
April 23 (3:30 p.m.)
Martin Luther King Jr. Performing Arts Center, Charlottesville High School, 1400 Melbourne Road
Charlottesville Symphony at the University of Virginia
Kate Tamarkin conducting
Wagner: “Die Meistersinger” Overture
Beethoven: Piano Concerto No. 4 in G major
Anne-Marie McDermott, piano
Elgar: “Enigma Variations”
$8-$45
(434) 924-3376
http://cvillesymphony.org

April 22 (7:30 p.m.)
Berglund Performing Arts Theatre, Orange Avenue at Williamson Road, Roanoke
April 23 (2:30 p.m.)
Center for Music Concert Hall, Liberty University, Lynchburg
Roanoke Symphony
David Stewart Wiley conducting
Handel: “Water Music” – hornpipe (April 22 only)
Handel: “Let the Bright Seraphim” (April 22 only)
Beethoven: Symphony No. 9 in D minor (“Choral”)
Adelaide Trombetta, soprano
Jan Wilson, alto
Jeffrey Springer, tenor
Wayne Kompelien, bass
Roanoke Symphony Chorus
guest choruses
$25-$52
(540) 343-9127
http://rso.com

April 22 (8 p.m.)
April 23 (3 p.m.)
Music Center at Strathmore, 5301 Tuckerman Lane, North Bethesda, MD
National Philharmonic
Piotr Gajewski conducting
Bruch: “Kol Nidrei”
Bloch: “Schelomo”
Zuill Bailey, cello
Mussorgsky-Ravel: “Pictures at an Exhibition”
$23-$78
(301) 581-5100
http://www.strathmore.org

April 23 (4 p.m.)
Perkinson Recital Hall, North Court, University of Richmond
Chamber Music Society of Central Virginia:
Diana Cohen & Daisuke Yamamoto, violins
Amadi Azikiwe, viola
James Wilson, cello
Tony Manzo, double-bass
Mary Boodell & Brandon Patrick George, flutes
Justin Bland, trumpet
Roman Rabinovich, piano
Franck: Piano Quintet in F minor
Saint-Saëns: Septet in E flat major, Op. 65
Fauré: Fantasie, Op. 79, for flute and piano
D’Indy: “Suite dans un style ancien,” Op. 24
$25
(804) 304-6312
http://cmscva.org

April 23 (5 p.m.)
Kennedy Center Concert Hall, Washington
Choral Arts Society of Washington & orchestra
Scott Tucker conducting
Mozart: Requiem
J.S. Bach: Cantata 51, “Jauchzet Gott in allen Landen”
Jake Runestad: work TBA (premiere)
Mozart: “Ave verum corpus”
Yuanming Song, soprano
Allegra De Vita, mezzo-soprano
Matthew Loyal Smith, tenor
Wei Wu, bass
$15-$69
(800) 444-1324
http://www.kennedy-center.org

April 25 (8 p.m.)
Theater of the Arts, University of the District of Columbia, Washington
Yefim Bronfman, piano
Bartók: Suite, Op. 14
Schumann: “Humoreske,” Op. 20
Debussy: “Suite Bergamasque”
Stravinsky: “Three Movements from ‘Petrouchka’ ”
$65
(202) 785-9727
http://washingtonperformingarts.org

April 26 (7:30 p.m.)
Family Theater, Kennedy Center, Washington
Fortas Chamber Music Series:
Elena Urioste, violin
Michael Brown, piano
Mozart: Sonata in A major, K. 526
Messiaen: Theme and Variations
Brahms: Sonata in G major, Op. 78
De Falla-Brown: “Suite Populaire Espagnole”
$45
(800) 444-1324
http://www.kennedy-center.org

April 27 (6:30 p.m.)
Hardywood Park Craft Brewery, Overbrook Road at Ownby Lane, Richmond
Richmond Symphony Rush Hour
Steven Smith conducting
works by Handel, Stravinsky, Beethoven, Mozart
$15 (seating limited)
(800) 514-3849 (ETIX)
http://www.richmondsymphony.com

April 28 (7 p.m.)
April 30 (4 p.m.)
Vlahcevic Concert Hall, Singleton Arts Center, Virginia Commonwealth University, Park Avenue at Harrison Street, Richmond
VCU Opera
Melanie Kohn Day directing
VCU Symphony Orchestra
Daniel Myssyk conducting
Puccini: “Suor Angelica”
Puccini: “Gianni Schicchi”
casts TBA
in Italian
$15
(804) 828-6776
http://arts.vcu.edu/music/events/

April 28 (7:30 p.m.)
Second Baptist Church, River and Gaskins roads, Richmond
Richmond Symphony Chorus
Erin R. Freeman directing
“James Erb Choral Celebration”
Brahms: “A German Requiem” (excerpts)
Lassus: chanson and Magnificat on “Dessus le Marche d’Arras”
Erb: “Little Lamb”
Schumann-Erb: “John Anderson”
trad.-Erb: “My Lagan Love”
trad.-Erb: Suo Gan”
trad.-Erb: “Amazing Grace”
trad.-Erb: “Colorado Trail”
trad.-Erb: “Now is the Cool of the Evening”
trad.-Erb: “Shenandoah”
$20
(800) 514-3849 (ETIX)
http://www.richmondsymphony.com

April 28 (8 p.m.)
Old Cabell Hall, University of Virginia, Charlottesville
UVa Baroque Orchestra
David Sariti, violin & director
Mozart: Sonata in G major, K. 379
Mozart: Piano Concerto No. 12 in A major, K. 414
David Breitman, fortepiano
Haydn: Symphony No. 44 in E minor (“Mourning”)
$10
(434) 924-3376
http://music.virginia.edu/events

April 28 (7:30 p.m.)
April 30 (3 p.m.)
Shaftman Performance Hall, Jefferson Center, 541 Luck Ave. SW, Roanoke
Opera Roanoke
Roanoke Symphony
Steven White conducting
Carlisle Floyd: “Susannah”
Amy Cofield Williamson (Susannah)
Zachary James (Olin Blitch)
Scott Williamson, stage director
in English
$26-$105
(540) 345-2550
http://operaroanoke.org

April 28 (8 p.m.)
Kennedy Center Concert Hall, Washington
National Symphony Orchestra Pops
Steven Reineke conducting
LeAnn Rimes, guest star
$39-$109
(800) 444-1324
http://www.kennedy-center.org

April 29 (2 p.m.)
Theater of the Arts, University of the District of Columbia, Washington
Javier Perianes, piano
Schubert: Sonata in A major, D. 664
Schubert: “Three Piano Pieces,” D. 946
De Falla: “Homenaje (Le tombeau de Claude Debussy)”
Debussy: “Estampes” – “La soirée dans Grenade”
Debussy: Préludes, Book II – “La puerta del vino”
Debussy: Préludes, Book I – “La sérénade interrompue”
Albéniz: “Suite Iberia” – “Albayzín”
De Falla: “El amor brujo” Suite
$45
(202) 785-9727
http://washingtonperformingarts.org

April 29 (8 p.m.)
Kennedy Center Concert Hall, Washington
Renée Fleming VOICES:
Alan Cumming, vocalist
“Alan Cumming Sings Sappy Songs”
$29-$99
(800) 444-1324
http://www.kennedy-center.org

April 29 (8 p.m.)
Music Center at Strathmore, 5301 Tuckerman Lane, North Bethesda, MD
Baltimore Symphony Orchestra
Marin Alsop conducting
Arvo Pärt: Credo
Stravinsky: “Symphony of Psalms”
University of Maryland Concert Choir
Rachmaninoff: Symphony No. 2 in E minor
$35-$99
(877) 276-1444 (Baltimore Symphony box office)
http://www.strathmore.org

April 30 (3 p.m.)
Blackwell Auditorium, Randolph-Macon College, 205 Henry St., Ashland
Richmond Symphony
Chia-Hsuan Lin conducting
Handel: “Solomon” – “Entrance of the Queen of Sheba”
Stravinsky: “Danses concertantes”
Beethoven: “The Creatures of Prometheus” Overture
Mozart: Symphony No. 41 in C major, K. 551 (“Jupiter”)
$22
(800) 514-3849 (ETIX)
http://www.richmondsymphony.com

April 30 (4 p.m.)
River Road Church, Baptist, River and Ridge roads, Richmond
Repertoire Recital Series of Richmond chapter, American Guild of Organists:
David Higgs, organ
Liszt: “Prelude and Fugue on B-A-C-H”
Percy Whitlock: Sonata in C minor – III: Scherzetto
Karg-Elert: “Trois Impressions” Op. 72 –
I: “Harmonies du soir”
Dupré: “Variations sur un Nöel”
John Cook: Fanfare
William Albright: “Sweet Sixteenths: a Concert Rag for Organ”
Duruflé: Suite, Op. 5
donation requested
(804) 288-1131
http://richmondago.org

April 30 (3:30 p.m.)
Old Cabell Hall, University of Virginia, Charlottesville
John Mayhood, piano
Morton Feldman: “For Bunita Marcus”
pre-concert talk by Mayhood, 2 p.m., Room 107, Old Cabell Hall
$15
(434) 924-3376
http://music.virginia.edu/events

April 30 (7 p.m.)
Center for the Arts, George Mason University, Fairfax
Jeffrey Siegel, piano & speaker
“Keyboard Conversations: the Genius of Chopin”
Chopin: works TBA
$25-$42
(888) 945-2468 (Tickets.com)
http://cfa.gmu.edu/calendar

April 30 (4 p.m.)
Theater of the Arts, University of the District of Columbia, Washington
Eric Owens, bass-baritone 
Susanna Phillips, soprano
Myra Huang, piano
Schubert: Lieder TBA
$45
(202) 785-9727
http://washingtonperformingarts.org
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March 29
noon-3 p.m. EST
1700-2000 UTC/GMT
WDCE, University of Richmond
90.1 FM
http://www.wdce.org

Peter Warlock: “Capriol” Suite
Camerata Wales/
Owain Arwel Hughes
(BIS)

Bruch: Serenade in A minor
Salvatore Accardo, violin
Gewandhaus Orchestra, Leipzig/
Kurt Masur
(Philips)

Past Masters:
Delius: “On Hearing the First Cuckoo in Spring”
Royal Philharmonic/
Thomas Beecham
(recorded 1956)
(EMI Classics)

Mozart:
Oboe Concerto
in C major, K. 314
Heinz Holliger, oboe
Academy of St. Martin in the Fields/
Neville Marriner
(Philips)

Poulenc: Sextet for piano and winds
Pascal Rogé, piano
Patrick Gallois, flute
Maurice Bourgue, oboe
Michel Portal, clarinet
Amaury Wallez, bassoon
André Cazalet, French horn
(Decca)

J.S. Bach:
“Brandenburg” Concerto
No. 5 in D major,
BWV 1050
Akademie für
alte Musik Berlin/
Stefan Mai
(Harmonia Mundi)

Mason Bates:
“String Band”
Claremont Trio
(Innova)

Beethoven:
Symphony No. 6
in F major (“Pastoral”)
Orchestra of
the 18th Century/
Frans Brüggen
(Philips)
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March 22
noon-3 p.m. EST
1700-2000 UTC/GMT
WDCE, University of Richmond
90.1 FM
http://www.wdce.org

Alexander Reinagle: “Occasional Overture” in D major
(reconstruction by Bertil van Boer)
Sinfonia Finlandia Jyväskylä/
Patrick Gallois
(Naxos)

Jan Ladislav Dussek:
Piano Concerto in G minor
Andreas Staier,
fortepiano & director
Concerto Köln
(Capriccio)

Johann Friedrich Peter:
Quintet No. 1 in D major
American Moravian Chamber Ensemble
(New World)

François-Joseph Gossec: Symphony in D major,
Op. 5, No. 5 (“Pastorella”)
Tafelmusik/Jeanne Lamon
(CBC)

Past Masters:
Copland:
“Appalachian Spring” Suite
Boston Symphony Orchestra/
Aaron Copland
(recorded 1959)
(RCA Victor)

Debussy: “Printemps”
Cleveland Orchestra/Pierre Boulez
(Deutsche Grammophon)

Borodin:
Piano Quintet in C minor,
Op. posth.
Alexander Mogilevsky,
piano
Andrey Baranov &
Géza Hosszu-Legocky,
violins
Nora Romanoff, viola
Jing Zhao, cello
(Warner Classics)

Past Masters:
Dvorák:
Symphony No. 8 in G major
London Symphony Orchestra/István Kertész
(recorded 1963)
(Decca)
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Chuck Berry, who melded blues guitar licks and boogie-woogie rhythms with country balladry to produce the still-greatest examples of the rock ’n’ roll song, has died at 90.

Growing up in St. Louis in the 1930s and ’40s, Berry absorbed a variety of styles, from gospel and blues to swing and country, distilling them into a song form that became the model of the new rock ’n’ roll genre in the ’50s. His tunes were elevated by lyrics that combined a wit comparable to Noel Coward’s with the authenticity and enduring appeal of folksong.

“His guitar lines wired the lean twang of country and the bite of the blues into phrases with both a streamlined trajectory and a long memory. And tucked into the lighthearted, telegraphic narratives that he sang with such clear enunciation was a sly defiance, upending convention to claim the pleasures of the moment,” Jon Pareles writes in an obituary for The New York Times.

Berry’s lyrics, to my ears, place him in the triumvirate of great mid-20th century American merry pranksters, alongside Bugs Bunny and Archie Goodwin, the wise-cracking, street-savvy assistant to the pompous, cerebral detective in Rex Stout’s Nero Wolfe stories.

The inclusion of Berry’s “Johnny B. Goode” (1958) on a disc launched aboard the Voyager I spacecraft in 1977 prompted one of the most spot-on punchlines of any joke ever told on “Saturday Night Live.” First message to Earth from extraterrestrials: “Send more Chuck Berry.”

The full obituary by Pareles:

http://www.nytimes.com/2017/03/18/arts/chuck-berry-dead.html

Bill Wyman, the former culture editor of National Public Radio and Salon, casts Berry as head chef in devising the recipe of rock ’n’ roll, in a wide-ranging piece of pop musicology originally posted on Vulture, now re-posted on Slate:

http://www.slate.com/blogs/browbeat/2017/03/18/chuck_berry_dead_at_90_invented_the_idea_of_rock_and_roll.html
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Britannia rules the airwaves, in a program of British music ranging over four centuries. Along with familiar works such as Edward Elgar’s “Enigma Variations,” Benjamin Britten’s “Variations and Fugue on a Theme of Henry Purcell” (better-known as “The Young Person’s Guide to the Orchestra,” here without the narration), Ralph Vaughan Williams’ “Fantasia on a Theme of Thomas Tallis” and Purcell’s “Come, Ye Sons of Art,” a number of discoveries: the Cello Concerto in D minor of Charles Villers Stanford, Arthur Sullivan (minus William S. Gilbert) taking on “Macbeth,” and compositions by 18th-century Brits of the generation after Handel’s, including selections from Thomas Arne’s “Alfred,” the royal masque, introduced in 1740, that gave the world “Rule Britannia!”

March 15
noon-3 p.m. EST
1700-2000 UTC/GMT
WDCE, University of Richmond
90.1 FM
http://www.wdce.org

Past Masters:
William Boyce: Symphony No. 5 in D major
Academy of St. Martin in the Fields/
Neville Marriner
(recorded 1976)
(Decca)

Thomas Arne: “Rosamond” – “Rise, glory, rise”
Emma Kirkby, soprano
Academy of Ancient Music/
Christopher Hogwood
(Decca)

William Boyce:
“Solomon” –
“Softly rise,
o southern breeze”
Ian Bostridge, tenor
Albert Grazzi, bassoon
Sophie Daneman, soprano
Madeleine Shaw,
mezzo-soprano
Benjamin Hulett, tenor
Jonathan Gunthorpe, baritone
The English Concert/Bernard Labadie
(Warner Classics)

John Marsh: Symphony No. 10 in E flat major
(“A Conversation for Two Orchestras”)
London Mozart Players/Matthias Bamert
(Chandos)

Thomas Arne: “Alfred” –
Overture
“Through storms awhile
the sun obscure”
“O guardian angels,
o descend”
“See liberty, virtue and honour appearing”
“Rule Britannia!”
Jennifer Smith &
Christine Brandes, sopranos
David Daniels, countertenor
Jamie MacDougall, tenor
Philharmonia Baroque Orchestra & Chorale/
Nicholas McGegan
(Deutsche Harmonia Mundi)

Arthur Sullivan:
“Macbeth” Overture
Royal Philharmonic/
Royston Nash
(Decca)

Charles Villiers Stanford: Cello Concerto in D minor
Alexander Baillie, cello
Royal Philharmonic/
Nicholas Braithwaite
(Lyrita)

Past Masters:
Elgar: “Variations on an Original Theme” (“Enigma”)
London Symphony Orchestra/Pierre Monteux
(recorded 1958)
(Decca)

Thomas Tallis:
“Why Fum’th in Fight?”
Atlanta Symphony Chorus/
Norman Mackenzie
(Telarc)

Vaughan Williams:
“Fantasia on a Theme
of Thomas Tallis”
Atlanta Symphony Orchestra/
Robert Spano
(Telarc)

Past Masters:
Britten:
“Variations and Fugue on a Theme of Henry Purcell”
London Symphony Orchestra/Benjamin Britten
(recorded 1966)
(Decca)

Purcell:
“Come, Ye Sons of Art”
Emily van Evera, soprano
John Mark Ainsley &
Charles Daniels, tenors
David Thomas, bass
Taverner Consort
& Players/
Andrew Parrott
(EMI Classics)
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Pianist Richard Goode and Tan Dun and the China National Symphony Orchestra highlight the roster of classical artists scheduled to perform in the 2017-18 season of the University of Richmond’s Modlin Arts Center.

The center’s classical schedule next season also includes the Shanghai, Jerusalem and Escher string quartets, the latter performing with guitarist Jason Vieaux.

Tan Dun, perhaps the best-known contemporary composer from China, is the artistic director of the China National Symphony Orchestra. Their concert programs often mix works by Chinese and Western composers.

Three more new-music or cross-cultural events are on the schedule:

– The So Percussion quartet – Eric Cha-Beach, Josh Quillen, Adam Sliwinski, and Jason Treuting – joined by soprano Dawn Upshaw and her longtime recital accompanist, pianist Gilbert Kalish.

– eighth blackbird, UR’s resident contemporary music sextet, joined by composer-fiddler Dan Trueman and singer Iarla Ó Lionáird, in “Olagón: a Cantata in Doublespeak,” a concert-length work, based on
an Irish folk tale, composed by Trueman, Ó Lionáird and poet Paul Muldoon.

– “Songbook,” featuring vocalist Steven Page, a founding member of the Canadian pop-rock group Barenaked Ladies, and The Art of Time Ensemble, which bills its programming as “fusing high art and popular culture.”

A “Save the Date” advisory on the coming classical season was mailed last week to subscribers. Programs, ticket details and venues, as well as other Modlin Center offerings for 2017-18, will be announced later.

The Modlin Center’s 2017-18 classical dates, all at 7:30 p.m.:

Sept. 19 – Escher Quartet with guitarist Jason Vieaux.

Oct. 20 – Pianist Richard Goode.

Nov. 9 – Shanghai Quartet.

Feb. 7 – Steven Page & The Art of Time Ensemble in “Songbook.”

Feb. 14 – China National Symphony Orchestra, Tan Dun conducting.

March 21 – Jerusalem Quartet.

March 23 – eighth blackbird with composer-fiddler Dan Trueman and singer Iarla Ó Lionáird in “Olagón: a Cantata in Doublespeak.”

April 7 – So Percussion with soprano Dawn Upshaw and pianist Gilbert Kalish.

To be added to the Modlin Center’s mailing list, call the box office at (804) 289-8980, or visit http://modlin.richmond.edu
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