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Clarke Bustard
The Virginia Classical Music Blog
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Virginia Opera will stage its first productions of “The Seven Deadly Sins” by Kurt Weill and Bertolt Brecht and “Der Freischütz” by Carl Maria von Weber, as well as launching a five-year Puccini cycle, next season.

The company’s 2016-17 season will begin with “The Seven Deadly Sins,” on a double bill with Ruggero Leoncavallo’s “Pagliacci,” Sept. 30 and Oct. 2 and 4 at Norfolk’s Harrison Opera House, Oct. 8 and 9 at George Mason University’s Center for the Arts in Fairfax, and Oct. 14 and 16 at the Carpenter Theatre of Dominion Arts Center (formerly Richmond CenterStage).

Adam Turner, resident conductor of Virginia Opera and the first recipient of the Kurt Weill-Julius Rudel Conducting Fellowship, will lead the Weill-Leoncavallo double bill, with stage direction by Keturah Stickann. Ute Gfrerer, in her US operatic stage debut, will star in “The Seven Deadly Sins.” The cast of “Pagliacci” will be led by Kelly Kaduce and Michael Chioldi.

“The Seven Deadly Sins” will be sung in English, “Pagliacci” in Italian, both with projected captions.

The company’s second production of the ’16-’17 season will be Gioachino Rossini’s greatest hit, “The Barber of Seville,” first produced in 1816. Performances are slated for Nov. 11, 13 and 15 in Norfolk, Nov. 18 and 20 in Richmond, and Dec. 3 and 4 in Fairfax.

Will Liverman, a Virginia Beach native, will star as the barber Figaro, in a cast also featuring Megan Marino and Andrew Owens. The production, in Italian with English captions, will be conducted by John Baril, music director of Colorado’s Central City Opera, and directed by Michael Shell.

“Der Freischütz,” staged as “The Magic Marksman” in an English translation with captions, will star Issachah Savage, winner of the 2014 Seattle Wagner Competition and rated as one of the leading young Heldentenors of opera in the US. The cast also will include Katherine Polit and Jake Gardner.

Turner will conduct and Stephen Lawless will direct the Weber, presented on Jan. 27, 29 and 31 in Norfolk, Feb. 4 and 5 in Fairfax, and Feb. 17 and 19 in Richmond.

Virginia Opera’s ’16-’17 season concludes with Giacomo Puccini’s last opera, “Turandot,” staged on March 17, 19 and 21 in Norfolk, March 25 and 26 in Fairfax, and March 31 and April 2 in Richmond. Kelly Kae Hogan will sing the title role, and Roger Honeywell will co-star as Calaf, voice of the popular aria “Nessun dorma.”

“Turandot,” sung in Italian with English captions, will be conducted by John DeMain and directed by Lillian Groag.

For information on ticket subscriptions for the Norfolk and Richmond seasons, call (866) 673-7282 or visit http://www.vaopera.org

Fairfax subscriptions will go on sale this spring.
3 months ago | |
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Kitty Kallen, the singer who took “Little Things Mean a Lot” to the top of the pop charts in 1954, has died at 94.

The song was one of the two biggest hits for the Richmond songwriting duo of composer Carl Stutz and lyricist Edith Lindeman. The other was “Red Headed Stranger,” around which singer Willie Nelson devised a best-selling album in 1975.

A Kallen obituary by The Washington Post’s Adam Bernstein:

http://www.washingtonpost.com/entertainment/music/kitty-kallen-silken-voiced-pop-singer-of-little-things-mean-a-lot-dies-at-94/2016/01/07/e4819528-b571-11e5-a842-0feb51d1d124_story.html
3 months ago | |
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Pierre Boulez, a leader of the post-World War II compositional avant-garde who (in)famously declared, “Schoenberg is dead,” only to become a leading advocate of Schoenberg, Stravinsky, Bartók, Debussy, Messiaen and other modern composers in a long, stellar career as a conductor, has died at 90.

While some of his compositions, such as “Répons,” “Marteau Sans Maître,” “Pli Selon Pli” and his Second and Third piano sonatas, are rated as masterpieces of postwar art-music, Boulez was far more widely known as a conductor and organizer of musical enterprises.

He prevailed upon the French government to found the Institute for Research and Coordination of Acoustics and Music (IRCAM) and its resident Ensemble Intercontemporain, and subsequently to build the City of Music complex that houses the Paris Conservatoire.

Although Boulez had led orchestras and other ensembles since the 1940s, he came into his own as a conductor in the ’70s. He served as music advisor to the Cleveland Orchestra (1970-72) following the death of George Szell, and succeeded Leonard Bernstein as music director of the New York Philharmonic in 1971. During an often stormy six-year tenure in New York, he founded the “Rug Concerts,” a prototype of the informal concert series now staged by many classical-music ensembles.

He also was chief conductor of the BBC Symphony Orchestra (1971-75), served for many years as principal guest conductor of the Chicago Symphony Orchestra, and performed with other major orchestras.

In 1976, the centenary of Richard Wagner’s death, Boulez conducted the “Ring” cycle at Bayreuth, in a provocative production by Patrice Chéreau that was telecast and circulated on audio and video recordings. Boulez and Chéreau also collaborated in the first staging of the completed version of Alban Berg’s “Lulu” in 1979.

Boulez recorded many of the canonical works of 20th-century music with the New York Philharmonic, BBC Symphony and Cleveland Orchestra for Columbia (now Sony Classical) in the 1970s, and later with the Chicago Symphony, Cleveland Orchestra, Vienna Philharmonic and other ensembles for Deutsche Grammophon. His audio and video discography also includes some music of 18th- and 19th-century composers, notably Handel, Mozart, Beethoven and Bruckner.

An obituary by Paul Griffiths for The New York Times:

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/01/07/arts/music/pierre-boulez-french-composer-dies-90.html

An obituary by Tim Page for The Washington Post:

http://www.washingtonpost.com/entertainment/music/pierre-boulez-conductor-of-bracing-clarity-dies-at-90/2016/01/06/b1e9a82e-b474-11e5-a842-0feb51d1d124_story.html

An obituary by Mark Brown in The Guardian:

http://www.theguardian.com/music/2016/jan/06/pierre-boulez-classical-musics-maverick-dies-aged-90
3 months ago | |
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A new year, a new crop of musical anniversaries to mark: The 150th birthdays of Erik Satie and Ferrucio Busoni; the centenaries of the deaths of Enrique Granados, George Butterworth (both casualties of World War I) and Max Reger; and 50th, 100th, 150th and 200th anniversaries of works by composers ranging from Rossini and Schubert to Shostakovich and Ligeti.

Jan. 7
1-5 p.m. EST
1800-2200 UTC/GMT
WDCE, University of Richmond
90.1 FM
www.wdce.org

Rossini: “The Barber of Seville” Overture
Chamber Orchestra of Europe/Claudio Abbado (Deutsche Grammophon)

Past Masters:
Dohnányi: “Variations on a Nursery Song”
Erno Dohnányi, piano
London Symphony Orchestra/
Lawrance Collingwood
(EMI Classics)
(recorded 1931)

Debussy: Sonata for flute, viola and harp
Mathieu Dufour, flute
Gérard Caussé, viola
Isabelle Moretti, harp (Harmonia Mundi)

Ligeti: “Lux aeterna”
North German Radio Choir/Helmut Franz (Deutsche Grammophon)

Butterworth:
“A Shropshire Lad”
Royal Liverpool Philharmonic/
Grant Llewellyn (Argo)

Reger: “Four Tone Poems
after Arnold Böcklin”
Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra/Neeme Järvi (Chandos)

Granados: “Goyescas,” Book 2 – “Love and Death”
Jean-François Heisser, piano (Apex)

Past Masters:
Tchaikovsky: Symphony No. 1 in G minor
(“Winter Dreams”)
I: Allegro tranquillo
London Symphony Orchestra/
Igor Markevitch
(Newton Classics)
(recorded 1966)

Shostakovich:
Cello Concerto No. 2
Heinrich Schiff, cello
Bavarian Radio
Symphony Orchestra/
Maxim Shostakovich (Decca)

Rachmaninoff: “Études-tableaux,” Op. 39, Nos. 2-3
Sviatoslav Richter, piano (Regis)

Satie: “Trois Gymnopédies”
Satie: “Sonatine bureaucratique”
Satie: “Avant-dernières pensées” 
Aldo Ciccolini, piano
(EMI Classics)

Past Masters:
Schubert: Symphony
No. 4 in C minor (“Tragic”)
Vienna Philharmonic/
István Kertész
(Decca)
(recorded 1970)

Past Masters:
J.S. Bach: Partita in D minor, BWV 1004 – Chaconne
(transcribed by Ferrucio Busoni)
Ferrucio Busoni, piano (Dal Segno)
(1914 piano roll)
3 months ago | |
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Gianandrea Noseda, music director of the Teatro Regio Torino opera company in Turin and principal guest conductor of the Israel Philharmonic, will take over direction of Washington’s National Symphony Orchestra, succeeding Christoph Eschenbach.

Noseda, currently conducting Bizet’s “The Pearl Fishers” at the Metropolitan Opera in New York, will lead two NSO programs next season as music director-designate, and begin his tenure as music director in the 2017-18 season. His initial contract with the orchestra runs through 2020-21.

A 51-year-old native of Milan, Noseda served as chief conductor of the BBC Philharmonic in Manchester from 2002 to 2011 and principal guest conductor of the Mariinsky Theater in St. Petersburg from 1997 to 2007. He is a prolific recording artist, notably of the “Musica Italiana” series of works by Italian composers for Chandos Records. He was named Conductor of the Year for 2015 by Musical America.

In his most recent date with the National Symphony last November, “we felt a mutual respect and commitment to music-making that is the foundation of a successful artistic partnership from the start of our initial rehearsal,” Noseda said in a statement released by the Kennedy Center, under whose organizational umbrella the NSO operates.

Since that engagement, the orchestra’s players have been telling members of the conductor search committee, “Get this guy,” bass trombonist Matthew Guilford, one of the five musician representatives on the committee, told The Washington Post’s Anne Midgette:

http://www.washingtonpost.com/lifestyle/style/national-symphony-orchestra-names-rising-star-gianandrea-noseda-as-music-director/2016/01/04/e3f055c8-b2b9-11e5-a842-0feb51d1d124_story.html
3 months ago | |
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Gilbert Kaplan, the financier and publisher who became the leading authority on Mahler’s “Resurrection” Symphony (No. 2) – and the world’s best-known amateur conductor – has died at 74.

Kaplan, founder and publisher of the magazine Institutional Investor, developed an obsession with the Mahler Second after hearing Leopold Stokowski conduct the work in a 1965 concert.

The Mahler Second “made a personal connection, more than any music I had ever heard. I couldn’t explain it. I still can’t,” Kaplan told me in a 1996 interview, published in the Richmond Times-Dispatch. “[T]he way to unlock the mystery of why this music affected me in such a profound way, and to try to express it as I felt it and understood it,” he decided, “was to try to conduct it myself.”

He studied conducting, acquired Mahler’s autograph score, prevailed upon the publisher to correct numerous errors in what was then the standard printed score, and began conducting orchestras in the work. In time, many leading ensembles engaged Kaplan to lead the Mahler Second – he rarely conducted any other music – and prominent conductors sought his advice and consulted his writings on Mahler.

Kaplan led two recordings of the Mahler Second and a third of the piece in a chamber orchestration To my ears, his first recording, made with the London Symphony Orchestra in 1987, remains the best account on disc. (Not currently in print, it can be found on the used-disc market.)

An obituary in The Telegraph (UK):

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/obituaries/12077312/Gilbert-Kaplan-conductor-obituary.html

Kaplan “truly embodied all the positive aspects of the misused term, ‘Amateur.’ We all learned so much from his scholarship as well as understanding how one person can change the way we think,” conductor Leonard Slatkin writes in comments appended to Norman Lebrecht’s death notice on his Slipped Disc blog:

http://slippedisc.com/2016/01/sad-news-gilbert-kaplan-has-died/

A BBC documentary on Kaplan and the Mahler Second, centering on the 1987 recording sessions in Cardiff, Wales:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cFzRZpjxJug
3 months ago | |
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Bits of ivory – on the tips of violin bows, bells of bassoons, and components or decorative features of other instruments, from drums to bagpipes – can create bureaucratic and logistical nightmares for musicians on tour, who face seizure or quarantine of their instruments when they travel to and from the US and European countries that enforce a ban on importation of ivory in hopes of stemming the slaughter of elephants for their tusks.

Other rare or endangered substances used in making instruments can raise red flags in the customs shed, too.

Preparing for a tour of Europe, the National Symphony Orchestra has had to catalogue and secure permits for “the 46 bows its members are taking with ivory tips, the 16 bows with white oyster, which, although not a banned substance, must still be declared, and the 21 bows with water-monitor-lizard skin on the grip,” Cynthia Steele, the orchestra’s manager, tells The Washington Post’s T.R. Goldman:

http://www.washingtonpost.com/entertainment/music/ivory-at-the-tip-of-a-complex-issue-for-traveling-orchestra-members/2015/12/30/fb0c818e-8a49-11e5-be39-0034bb576eee_story.html
3 months ago | |
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Classical performances in and around Richmond, with selected events elsewhere in Virginia and the Washington area. Program information, provided by presenters, is updated as details become available. Adult single-ticket prices are listed; senior, student/youth, group and other discounts may be offered.

WEATHER ADVISORY: A major winter storm with heavy snowfall on the weekend of Jan. 22-24 is likely to cause postponement or cancellation of events throughout Virginia and in the Washington area. Check with presenters before heading out.

* In and around Richmond: Steven Smith conducts the Richmond Symphony, with singers from Virginia Opera’s Emerging Artist Program, in a Viennese New Year’s program of waltzes and other music of the Strausses (Johann and Richard), Jan. 9-10 at Richmond CenterStage, while the orchestra’s principal cellist, Neal Cary, plays Tchaikovsky’s “Rococo Variations” alongside works by Haydn, Ives and Clint Needham, in an abbreviated Rush-Hour concert on Jan. 14 at Hardywood Park Craft Brewery and a full program on Jan. 17 at Randolph-Macon College in Ashland. . . . Pianist Yefim Bronfman returns for a sampler of his ongoing recitals of the piano sonatas of Prokofiev,
Jan. 15 at the University of Richmond’s Modlin Arts Center.
. . . UR’s resident new-music sextet eighth blackbird performs in “Hand Eye,” a program of new and recent works by members of the Sleeping Giants composers’ collective, Jan. 27 at the Modlin Center. . . . Pianist Alexander Paley presents a mid-winter supplement to his fall music festival, performing Chopin’s waltzes and Rachmaninoff’s préludes on Jan. 30, and a family program of Tchaikovsky, Ravel and Prokofiev with pianist Daniel Stipe and narrator Pamela McClain on Jan. 31, both at St. Luke Lutheran Church.

* Noteworthy elsewhere: Pinchas Zukerman conducts and plays violin with the Royal Philharmonic in a program of Elgar, Mozart and Tchaikovsky, Jan. 9 at Christopher Newport University’s Ferguson Arts Center in Newport News. . . . Katherine Needleman, onetime principal oboist of the Richmond Symphony, now playing the same role in the Baltimore Symphony, is the soloist in Christopher Rouse’s Oboe Concerto, on a program also featuring music of Brahms and Beethoven, with Marin Alsop conducting, Jan. 14 at Strathmore in the Maryland suburbs of DC. . . . Musicians from Marlboro, featuring Anthony McGill, principal clarinetist of the New York Philharmonic, play works of Brahms, Beethoven and Penderecki, Jan. 20 at the Library of Congress in Washington. . . . The JACK Quartet plays works from the University of Virginia’s Composition & Computer Technologies Program, Jan. 29 at UVa’s Old Cabell Hall.
. . . Behzod Abduraimov, the highly praised young piano virtuoso from Uzbekistan, plays Chopin and Mussorgsky, Jan. 30 at Washington’s Kennedy Center (sold out – waiting list for tickets). . . . Violinist Julian Rachlin joins Daniele Gatti and Orchestre National de France in a program of Shostakovich, Tchaikovsky and Debussy, Jan. 31at the Kennedy Center.


Jan. 3 (3 p.m.)
Music Center at Strathmore, 5301 Tuckerman Lane, North Bethesda, MD
Strauss Symphony Orchestra of America
Matthias Fletzberger conducting
Natalia Ushakova, soprano
Brian Cheney, tenor
dancers from Europaballet St. Pölten
International Champion Ballroom Dancers
“A Salute to Vienna”
program TBA
$49-$89
(301) 581-5100
www.strathmore.org

Jan. 8 (8:15 p.m.)
Music Center at Strathmore, 5301 Tuckerman Lane, North Bethesda, MD
Baltimore Symphony Orchestra
Marin Alsop conducting and speaking
“Off the Cuff: Rachmaninoff’s Symphony No. 3”
$35-$99
(877) 276-1444 (Baltimore Symphony box office)
www.strathmore.org

Jan. 9 (2 p.m.)
Gellman Room, Richmond Public Library, First and Franklin streets
Ruta Smedina-Starke & Sharon Stewart, piano
works TBA by Beethoven, Ravel, Fauré, R.A. Scott
free
(804) 646-7223
www.richmondpubliclibrary.org

Jan. 9 (8 p.m.)
Jan. 10 (3 p.m.)
Carpenter Theatre, Richmond CenterStage, Sixth and Grace streets
Richmond Symphony
Steven Smith conducting
singers TBA from Virginia Opera Emerging Artist Program
Johann Strauss II: “On the Beautiful Blue Danube”
Johann Strauss II: dances, operetta arias TBA
Richard Strauss: “Der Rosenkavalier” Suite
$10-$78
(800) 514-3849 (ETIX)
www.richmondsymphony.com

Jan. 9 (8 p.m.)
Ferguson Arts Center, Christopher Newport University, Newport News
Royal Philharmonic
Pinchas Zukerman conducting
Elgar: Serenade for strings
Mozart: Violin Concerto No. 5 in A major, K. 219 (“Turkish”)
Pinchas Zukerman, violin
Tchaikovsky: Symphony No. 5 in E minor
$27-$87
(855) 337-4849
www.fergusoncenter.org

Jan. 9 (8 p.m.)
Music Center at Strathmore, 5301 Tuckerman Lane, North Bethesda, MD
Brian Ganz, piano
Iwona Sobotka, soprano
Chopin: songs TBA
Chopin: Cantabile in B flat major
Chopin: Impromptu in A flat major, Op. 29
Chopin: Nocturne in F major, Op. 15, No. 1
Chopin: Nocturne in C minor, Op. posth.
Chopin: Sonata No. 3 in B minor, Op. 58
$39-$89
www.strathmore.org

Jan. 10 (3 p.m.)
Music Center at Strathmore, 5301 Tuckerman Lane, North Bethesda, MD
Baltimore Symphony Orchestra
Marin Alsop & Joseph Young conducting
Alan Shulman: “A Laurentian Overture”
Prokofiev: Piano Concerto No. 4 for the left hand
Leon Fleisher, piano
Rachmaninoff: Symphony No. 3
$35-$99
(877) 276-1444 (Baltimore Symphony box office)
www.strathmore.org

Jan. 14 (6:30 p.m.)
Hardywood Park Craft Brewery, Overbrook Road at Ownby Lane, Richmond
Richmond Symphony
Steven Smith conducting
Ives: “The Unanswered Question”
Tchaikovsky: “Rococo Variations”
Neal Cary, cello
Clint Needham: “Urban Sprawl”
Haydn: Symphony No. 92 in G major (“Oxford”) (excerpts)
$15
(800) 514-3849 (ETIX)
www.richmondsymphony.com

Jan. 14 (7 p.m.)
Jan. 15 (8 p.m.)
Jan. 16 (8 p.m.)
Kennedy Center Concert Hall, Washington
National Symphony Orchestra
Neeme Järvi conducting
Heino Eller: “Five Pieces for String Orchestra”
Prokofiev: Violin Concerto No. 1 in D major
Baiba Skride, violin
Sibelius: Symphony No. 2 in D major
$15-$89
(800) 444-1324
www.kennedy-center.org

Jan. 14 (8 p.m.)
Music Center at Strathmore, 5301 Tuckerman Lane, North Bethesda, MD
Baltimore Symphony Orchestra
Marin Alsop conducting
Brahms: “Academic Festival” Overture
Christopher Rouse: Oboe Concerto
Katherine Needleman, oboe
Beethoven: Symphony No. 3 in E flat major (“Eroica”)
$40-$104
(877) 276-1444 (Baltimore Symphony box office)
www.strathmore.org

Jan. 15 (7:30 p.m.)
Camp Concert Hall, Modlin Arts Center, University of Richmond
Yefim Bronfman, piano
Prokofiev: Sonata No. 5 in C major, Op. 38/135
Prokofiev: Sonata No. 6 in A major, Op. 82
Prokofiev: Sonata No. 7 in B flat major, Op. 83
$40
(804) 289-8980
www.modlin.richmond.edu

Jan. 16 (2 p.m.)
Coolidge Auditorium, Library of Congress, First Street at Independence Avenue N.E., Washington
Alban Gerhardt, cello
Anne-Marie McDermott, piano
Barber: Cello Sonata, Op. 6
Britten: Sonata in C major, Op. 65
Lukas Foss: Capriccio
Bernstein: Mass – “Three Meditations”
Gershwin-Heifetz-Gerhardt: 3 preludes
Piazzolla: “Grand Tango”
free; tickets required
(703) 573-7328 (Ticketmaster)
www.loc.gov/concerts

Jan. 16 (8 p.m.)
Music Center at Strathmore, 5301 Tuckerman Lane, North Bethesda, MD
National Philharmonic
Piotr Gajewski conducting
Mozart: Divertimento in D major, K. 136
J.S. Bach: Violin Concerto in E major, BWV 1042
Colin Sorgi, violin
Grieg: “Holberg” Suite
Britten: “Simple Symphony”
$29-$89
(301) 581-5100
www.strathmore.org

Jan. 17 (3 p.m.)
Blackwell Auditorium, Randolph-Macon College, 205 Henry St., Ashland
Richmond Symphony
Steven Smith conducting
Ives: “The Unanswered Question”
Tchaikovsky: “Rococo Variations”
Neal Cary, cello
Clint Needham: “Urban Sprawl”
Haydn: Symphony No. 92 in G major (“Oxford”)
$20
(800) 514-3849 (ETIX)
www.richmondsymphony.com

Jan. 17 (7 p.m.)
Calvary Revival Church, 5833 Poplar Hall Drive, Norfolk
Virginia Symphony
conductor TBA
“Songs for a Dreamer: a Tribute to Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.”
program TBA
free
(757) 892-6366
www.virginiasymphony.org

Jan. 17 (2 p.m.)
Terrace Theater, Kennedy Center, Washington
Kennedy Center Chamber Players
Richard Strauss: “Capriccio” – Sextet
Mozart: Horn Quintet in E flat major, K. 407
J.S. Bach-Varga: Partita No. 2 in D minor – Chaconne (arranged for four cellos)
Mendelssohn: Quartet in A major, Op. 18
$35
(800) 444-1324
www.kennedy-center.org

Jan. 20 (7 p.m.)
Terrace Theater, Kennedy Center, Washington
Alyson Cambridge, soprano
Christine Lamprea, cello
Ina Zdorovetchi, harp
Kevin Miller, piano
“In Her Voice”
William Bolcom: “From the Diary of Sally Hemings”
Jeffrey Mumford: “three windows” (premiere)
Adam Schoenberg: new work TBA (premiere)
$40
(202) 785-9727 (Washington Performing Arts)
www.wpas.org

Jan. 20 (8 p.m.)
Coolidge Auditorium, Library of Congress, First Street at Independence Avenue N.E., Washington
Musicians from Marlboro:
Anthony McGill, clarinet
Emilie-Anne Gendron & David McCarroll, violins
Daniel Kim, viola
Marcy Rosen, cello
Beethoven: String Trio in C minor, Op. 9, No. 3
Penderecki: Quartet for clarinet and string trio
Brahms: Clarinet Quintet in B minor, Op. 115
free; tickets required
(703) 573-7328 (Ticketmaster)
www.loc.gov/concerts

Jan. 21 (7:30 p.m.)
Carpenter Theatre, Richmond CenterStage, Sixth and Grace streets
Band of the Royal Marines
pipes, drums & Highland dancers of the Scots Guards
program TBA
$30-$38
(804) 289-8980 (UR Modlin Center box office)
www.modlin.richmond.edu

Jan. 21 (7 p.m.)
Jan. 22 (8 p.m.)
Jan. 23 (8 p.m.)
Kennedy Center Concert Hall, Washington
National Symphony Orchestra
Christoph Eschenbach conducting
Christopher Rouse: “Phaethon”
Dvorák: Cello Concerto in B minor
Daniel Müller-Schott, cello
Brahms-Schoenberg: Piano Quartet in G minor, Op. 25
$15-$89
(800) 444-1324
www.kennedy-center.org

Jan. 21 (8 p.m.)
Music Center at Strathmore, 5301 Tuckerman Lane, North Bethesda, MD
Baltimore Symphony Orchestra
Constantine Kitsopoulos conducting
“Pixar in Concert”
$21-$99
(877) 276-1444 (Baltimore Symphony box office)
www.strathmore.org

Jan. 22 (8 p.m.)
Chrysler Hall, 215 St. Paul’s Boulevard, Norfolk
Jan. 23 (8 p.m.)
Ferguson Arts Center, Christopher Newport University, Newport News
Jan. 24 (2:30 p.m.)
Sandler Arts Center, 201 S. Market St., Virginia Beach
Virginia Symphony
JoAnn Falletta conducting
Tchaikovsky: Piano Concerto No. 1 in B flat minor
Natasha Peremski, piano
Bartók: Concerto for Orchestra
Dohnányi: “Symphonic Minutes”
$25-$110
(757) 892-6366
www.virginiasymphony.org

Jan. 23 (8 p.m.)
Altria Theater, Main and Laurel streets, Richmond
Richmond Symphony
conductor TBA
“Video Games Live”
$20-$70
(800) 514-3849 (ETIX)
www.richmondsymphony.com

Jan. 23 (2 and 8 p.m.)
Center for the Arts, George Mason University, Fairfax
Band of the Royal Marines
pipes, drums & Highland dancers of the Scots Guards
program TBA
$31-$52
(888) 945-2468 (Tickets.com)
www.cfa.gmu.edu

Jan. 24 (4 p.m.)
Vlahcevic Concert Hall, Singleton Arts Center, Virginia Commonwealth University, Park Avenue at Harrison Street, Richmond
VCU Guitar Series:
Sam Dorsey, classical guitar
program TBA
$15
(804) 828-6776
http://arts.vcu.edu/music/events/

Jan. 24 (4 p.m.)
Performing Arts Theatre, Berglund Center, Orange Avenue at Williamson Road, Roanoke
Roanoke Symphony
Roanoke Symphony Youth Orchestra
David Stewart Wiley, conductor, pianist & narrator
Plastic Musik, guest stars
Russell Peck: “The Thrill of the Orchestra”
works TBA by Tchaikovsky, Wagner, Holst, John Williams
$15
(540) 343-9127
www.rso.com

Jan. 25 (8 p.m.)
Old Cabell Hall, University of Virginia, Charlottesville
Rivanna String Quartet
Shostakovich: Quartet No. 3
Libby Larsen: “Sorrow Song and Jubilee”
Schubert: Quartet in G major, D. 887
$15 
(434) 924-3376
www.music.virginia.edu

Jan. 25 (7 p.m.)
Terrace Theater, Kennedy Center, Washington
Thymos Quartet
Christoph Eschenbach, piano
Yann Dubost, double-bass
Schubert: Quartet in A minor, D. 804 (“Rosamunde”)
Olivier Dujours: String Quartet 17 (“Creation”)
Schubert: Piano Quintet in A major, D. 667 (“Trout”)
$50
(800) 444-1324
www.kennedy-center.org

Jan. 26 (7 p.m.)
Terrace Theater, Kennedy Center, Washington
Young Concert Artists:
Edgar Moreau, cello
Jessica Osborne, piano
J.S. Bach: Sonata in G minor, BWV 1029
Franck: Sonata in A major
Schnittke: Cello Sonata No. 1
Chopin: “Introduction and Polonaise brilliante,” Op. 3
$35
(800) 444-1324
www.kennedy-center.org

Jan. 27 (7:30 p.m.)
Camp Concert Hall, Modlin Arts Center, University of Richmond
eighth blackbird
“Hand Eye”
works by Sleeping Giant composers’ collective: Ted Hearne, Robert Honstein, Christopher Cerrone, Timo Andres
$20
(804) 289-8980
www.modlin.richmond.edu

Jan. 28 (7 p.m.)
Vlahcevic Concert Hall, Singleton Arts Center, Virginia Commonwealth University, Park Avenue at Harrison Street, Richmond
Atlantic Chamber Ensemble
“For Everything, a Season . . . of Fear”
works TBA by Shostakovich, Martinu, others
free
(804) 828-6776
http://arts.vcu.edu/music

Jan. 28 (7 p.m.)
Kennedy Center Concert Hall, Washington
National Symphony Orchestra
Christoph Eschenbach conducting
Weber: “Der Freischütz” Overture
Schubert: Symphony No. 8 in B minor (“Unfinished”)
Beethoven: Symphony No. 7 in A major
$15-$89
(800) 444-1324
www.kennedy-center.org

Jan. 28 (7 p.m.)
Terrace Theater, Kennedy Center, Washington
Chad Hoopes, violin
David Fung, piano
Dvorák: Sonatina in G major, Op. 100
Prokofiev: “Five Melodies,” Op. 35
Ravel: “Tzigane”
Franck: Sonata in A major
$40
(202) 785-9727 (Washington Performing Arts)
www.wpas.org

Jan. 29 (7:30 p.m.)
St. Bridget Catholic Church, 6006 Three Chopt Road, Richmond
Daniel Stipe, organ
program TBA
donation requested
(804) 282-9511
www.saintbridgetchurch.org

Jan. 29 (8 p.m.)
Ferguson Arts Center, Christopher Newport University, Newport News
Jan. 30 (8 p.m.)
Chrysler Hall, 215 St. Paul’s Boulevard, Norfolk
Virginia Symphony Pops
Benjamin Rous conducting
Steve Lippia, guest star
“Sinatra Centennial”
$25-$95
(757) 892-6366
www.virginiasymphony.org

Jan. 29 (8 p.m.)
Old Cabell Hall, University of Virginia, Charlottesville
JACK Quartet
works TBA by graduate students in UVa’s Composition & Computer Technologies Program
free
(free master class at 9:30 a.m. in Room b18, Old Cabell Hall)
(434) 924-3376
www.music.virginia.edu

Jan. 29 (8 p.m.)
Kennedy Center Concert Hall, Washington
National Symphony Orchestra
Christoph Eschenbach conducting
Beethoven: Symphony No. 7 in A major
Brahms: Symphony No. 1 in C minor
$15-$89
(800) 444-1324
www.kennedy-center.org

Jan. 30 (11 a.m.)
Carpenter Theatre, Richmond CenterStage, Sixth and Grace streets
Richmond Symphony LolliPops
Chia-Hsuan Lin conducting
Kimberly Schroder, soprano
Michael Boudewyns, actor
“Green Eggs and Ham”
$17 (adult), $12 (child)
(800) 514-3849 (ETIX)
www.richmondsymphony.com

Jan. 30 (2 p.m.)
Gellman Room, Richmond Public Library, First and Franklin streets
Michelle Huang, piano
Violaine Michel, violin
“Dances around the World – from Europe to America
program TBA
free
(804) 646-7223
www.richmondpubliclibrary.org

Jan. 30 (7:30 p.m.)
St. Luke Lutheran Church, 7757 Chippenham Parkway, Richmond
Alexander Paley, piano
Chopin: 14 waltzes
Rachmaninoff: préludes, Op. 3, No. 2; Op. 23
$20 donation suggested
(804) 665-9516
www.paleymusicfestival.org

Jan. 30 (8 p.m.)
Center for the Arts, George Mason University, Fairfax
Polish Baltic Philharmonic
Boguslaw Dawidow conducting
Wagner: “The Flying Dutchman” Overture
Rimsky-Korsakov: “Scheherazade”
Chopin: Piano Concerto No. 2 in F minor
Marcin Koziak, piano
$30-$50
(888) 945-2468 (Tickets.com)
www.cfa.gmu.edu

Jan. 30 (2 p.m.)
Terrace Theater, Kennedy Center, Washington
Behzod Abduraimov, piano
Chopin: ballades, Opp. 23, 38, 47, 52
Mussorgsky: “Pictures at an Exhibition”
$60 (waiting list)
(202) 785-9727 (Washington Performing Arts)
www.wpas.org

Jan. 30 (8 p.m.)
Kennedy Center Concert Hall, Washington
National Symphony Orchestra
Christoph Eschenbach conducting
Weber: “Der Freischütz” Overture
Schubert: Symphony No. 8 in B minor (“Unfinished”)
Brahms: Symphony No. 1 in C minor
$15-$89
(800) 444-1324
www.kennedy-center.org

Jan. 30 (8 p.m.)
Music Center at Strathmore, 5301 Tuckerman Lane, North Bethesda, MD
Baltimore Symphony Orchestra
Jakub Hruša conducting
Janácek: “Jealousy”
Sibelius: Violin Concerto in D major
Sergey Khatchatryan, violin
Brahms: Symphony No. 4 in E minor
$35-$99
(877) 276-1444 (Baltimore Symphony box office)
www.strathmore.org

Jan. 31 (3 p.m.)
St. Luke Lutheran Church, 7757 Chippenham Parkway, Richmond
Alexander Paley & Daniel Stipe, piano four-hands
Pamela McClain, narrator
“Beauties and Beasts”
Tchaikovsky: “Children’s Album”
Ravel: “Mother Goose” Suite
Prokofiev: “Peter and the Wolf”
$20 donation suggested
(804) 665-9516
www.paleymusicfestival.org

Jan. 31 (3 p.m.)
Sandler Arts Center, 201 S. Market St., Virginia Beach
Virginia Symphony
Bay Youth Symphony Orchestra
conductor TBA
“Blast Off! A Symphony in Space”
$10
(757) 892-6366
www.virginiasymphony.org

Jan. 31 (2 p.m.)
Terrace Theater, Kennedy Center, Washington
Vocal Arts DC:
David Daniels, countertenor
Martin Katz, piano
works TBA by Purcell, Handel, Brahms, Hahn, Vaughan Williams; American folk songs
$50
(800) 444-1324
www.kennedy-center.org

Jan. 31 (4 p.m.)
Kennedy Center Concert Hall, Washington
Orchestre National de France
Daniele Gatti conducting
Debussy: “Prelude to the Afternoon of a Faun”
Shostakovich: Violin Concerto No. 1
Julian Rachlin, violin
Tchaikovsky: Symphony No. 5 in E minor
$55-$120
(202) 785-9727 (Washington Performing Arts)
www.wpas.org
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Another holiday special at a special time: We ring out the old year and anticipate the new with our annual Habsburg Sock-Hop, a more expansive take on the traditional Viennese New Year waltz program, with dances from the many lands along the Danube in central and eastern Europe and the Balkans, once ruled by the Habsburg dynasty in its sprawling, multicultural Austro-Hungarian Empire.

We’ll hear waltzes, Ländler, polkas, mazurkas, furiants and other dances, as heard at their folk roots and through their varied classical branches.

Dec. 31
1-5 p.m. EST
1800-2200 UTC/GMT
WDCE, University of Richmond
90.1 FM
www.wdce.org

Past Masters:
Haydn: Symphony No. 36 in C major – I: Vivace
Philharmonia Hungarica/
Antál Doráti (Decca)
(recorded 1970)

Johann Strauss II: “Emperor” Waltz
London Philharmonic/
Franz Welser-Möst
(EMI Seraphim)

Past Masters:
Rossini: “The Thieving Magpie” Overture
Royal Philharmonic/
Colin Davis (EMI Classics)
(recorded 1961)

Josef Lanner: “Styrian Dances”
Josef Lanner: “New Viennese Ländler”
Johann Strauss I: “Court-Ball Dances”
trad.-Franz Gruber: “Dances of Old Vienna”
Willi Boskovsky Ensemble (Alto)

Liszt: “Mephisto” Waltz No. 1
Evgeny Kissin, piano (RCA Victor)

Suk: “Fantastické scherzo”
Buffalo Philharmonic/
JoAnn Falletta (Naxos)

trad. Czech:
“Wallachian Lament”
Apollo Chamber Players (Navona)

Dvorák: Piano Trio in E minor, Op. 90 (“Dumky”)
Eroica Trio (EMI Classics)

Smetana: “The Bartered Bride” – Polka, Furiant
Cleveland Orchestra/Christoph von Dohnányi (London)

Gorécki: “Little Requiem for a Polka”
Schönberg Ensemble/Reinbert de Leeuw
(Newton Classics)

Chopin: Polonaise in A flat major, Op. 53 (“Heroic”)
Maurizio Pollini, piano (Deutsche Grammophon)

Past Masters:
Szymanowski: Mazurkas,
Op. 50, Nos. 1, 2, 3, 6
Arthur Rubinstein, piano (RCA Victor)
(recorded 1961)

Luka Sorkocevic:
Symphony No. 3 in D major
Salzburger Hofmusik/
Wolfgang Brunner (cpo)

Brahms: Piano Quartet in G minor, Op. 25 –
IV: “Rondo alla zingarese”
(orchestration by Arnold Schoenberg)
Houston Symphony Orchestra/
Christoph Eschenbach (RCA Victor)

trad. Hungarian: “Maramaros dances”
Márta Sebestyén, vocalist
Muzsikás (Hannibal)

Bartók: “Dance Suite”
Chicago Symphony Orchestra/Pierre Boulez (Deutsche Grammophon)

trad. Roma: Suite – Doina, Purtata, Hora “ka ka kaval”
Hesperion XXI/
Jordi Savall (AliaVox)

Ligeti: “Concert Romanesc”
Berlin Philharmonic/Jonathan Nott (Teldec)

Kodály: “Dances of Galanta”
Chicago Symphony Orchestra/Neeme Järvi (Chandos)
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John Duffy, a prolific composer who in 1982 organized the Meet the Composer program that places composers in residencies with US orchestras and more recently ran the John Duffy Composers Institute of the Virginia Arts Festival, has died at 89.

Duffy, a New York native who settled in Norfolk, wrote more than 300 works for the concert hall, theater, television and film, among them the opera “Muhammad Ali” and Emmy Award-winning scores for “A Talent for Life: Jews of the Italian Renaissance,” telecast by NBC, and the PBS series “Heritage: Civilization and the Jews.”

Ed Harsh, CEO of New Music USA, the organization formed after the merger of Meet the Composer and the American Music Center, recalls Duffy’s “healthy disregard for conventional hierarchies” of music.

“For John, the idea that a ‘classical’ symphonic work was, by nature, automatically worthy of higher status than the work of, say, Ornette Coleman or Burt Bacharach – to use two of his favorite examples – was simply bunk. . . . The exploding variety of creativity we’re blessed with in 2015, which blows through genre categories like so much thin air, may obscure for us now the uncommon character of his views,” Harsh writes in a remembrance of Duffy for New Music USA’s web magazine New Music Box:

http://www.newmusicbox.org/articles/remembering-composer-and-mtc-founder-john-duffy-1926/

An obituary by William Grimes for The New York Times:

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/12/29/arts/music/john-duffy-composer-who-aided-his-contemporaries-dies-at-89.html
3 months ago | |
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