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Classical Music Discoveries
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Bruckner: Symphony No. 1 in C minor, WAB 101 Borodin: Symphony No. 1 in C-flat Major Dominique Beaulieu, conductor CMD Philharmonic of Paris in Orlean Purchase now at: http://www.classicalsavings.com/store/p546/The_First_Symphonies_%233.html
4 months ago |
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Elektra, Op. 58, is a one-act opera by Richard Strauss, to a German-language libretto by Hugo von Hofmannsthal, which he adapted from his 1903 drama Elektra. The opera was the first of many collaborations between Strauss and Hofmannsthal. It was first performed at the Dresden State Opera on 25 January 1909. It was dedicated to his friends Natalie and Willy Levin. Joana Filipe Martinez - producer/director/conductor ?CMD Grand Opera Company of Barcelona Purchase now at: http://www.classicalsavings.com/store/p545/R_Strauss%3A_Elektra.html Synopsis: Mycenae, ancient Greece. In the courtyard of the royal palace, servant girls comment on the wild behavior of Elektra, the eldest daughter of the late king Agamemnon. After they have left, Elektra appears, dressed in rags (“Allein! Weh, ganz, allein”). She is obsessed with thoughts of her father’s murder at the hands of her mother, Klytämnestra, and her mother’s lover, Aegisth. Calling on her father’s spirit, she renews her vow of vengeance. Her tirade is interrupted by her younger sister, Chrysothemis, who urges Elektra to give up her obsession with revenge so they both can lead normal lives. Elektra mocks Chrysothemis, who runs off as noises from within the palace announce the approach of Klytämnestra. The queen staggers in. Drugs, loss of sleep, and fear of retribution for her husband’s murder have made a wreck of her (“Ich habe keine guten Nächte”). Surprised that Elektra will talk to her, she appeals to her daughter’s intelligence and demands to know what she needs to do to find peace of mind. A sacrifice has to be made, Elektra replies. When Klytämnestra fails to comprehend what her daughter is hinting at, Elektra screams at her that it is Klytämnestra herself who must die and that she and her banished brother Orest will kill her (“Was bluten muss?”). Klytämnestra is horrified, but when her confidante runs in and whispers something, her mood changes abruptly. Laughing maniacally, she disappears into the palace. Her behavior is explained when Chrysothemis reappears with news that Orest is dead. Stunned, Elektra at first refuses to believe her, then tells her sister that she must now help kill Klytämnestra and Aegisth. Chrysothemis runs off in terror. As Elektra frantically starts digging for the buried axe that killed Agamemnon, a stranger appears. She asks him what he wants and he calmly replies that he has been sent to bring news of Orest’s death (“Was willst du, fremder Mensch?”). But when Elektra reveals that she is Agamemnon’s daughter, he tells her Orest lives. Suddenly servants appear, kissing his hands and feet. Frightened, Elektra asks who he is. The dogs in the courtyard know me, the stranger replies, but not my own sister? Crying his name, Elektra gives in to her unspeakable joy and declares she has lived only to avenge their father’s murder. When Orest’s guardian tells him the queen waits inside, the men enter the palace. Elektra waits anxiously and when a scream is heard she knows Orest has killed their mother. Aegisth arrives, having heard the news of Orest’s death, and Elektra lights his way into the palace with sarcastic courtesy. A moment later he reappears at a window, crying for help, before he is dragged inside and killed. While tumultuous confusion spreads through the palace and courtyard, Elektra, in a state of ecstasy, begins a triumphal dance. Chrysothemis returns but Elektra doesn’t hear her and at the climax of the dance falls dead.
4 months ago |
Tag
Elektra, Op. 58, is a one-act opera by Richard Strauss, to a German-language libretto by Hugo von Hofmannsthal, which he adapted from his 1903 drama Elektra. The opera was the first of many collaborations between Strauss and Hofmannsthal. It was first performed at the Dresden State Opera on 25 January 1909. It was dedicated to his friends Natalie and Willy Levin. Joana Filipe Martinez - producer/director/conductor ?CMD Grand Opera Company of Barcelona Purchase now at: http://www.classicalsavings.com/store/p545/R_Strauss%3A_Elektra.html Synopsis: Mycenae, ancient Greece. In the courtyard of the royal palace, servant girls comment on the wild behavior of Elektra, the eldest daughter of the late king Agamemnon. After they have left, Elektra appears, dressed in rags (“Allein! Weh, ganz, allein”). She is obsessed with thoughts of her father’s murder at the hands of her mother, Klytämnestra, and her mother’s lover, Aegisth. Calling on her father’s spirit, she renews her vow of vengeance. Her tirade is interrupted by her younger sister, Chrysothemis, who urges Elektra to give up her obsession with revenge so they both can lead normal lives. Elektra mocks Chrysothemis, who runs off as noises from within the palace announce the approach of Klytämnestra. The queen staggers in. Drugs, loss of sleep, and fear of retribution for her husband’s murder have made a wreck of her (“Ich habe keine guten Nächte”). Surprised that Elektra will talk to her, she appeals to her daughter’s intelligence and demands to know what she needs to do to find peace of mind. A sacrifice has to be made, Elektra replies. When Klytämnestra fails to comprehend what her daughter is hinting at, Elektra screams at her that it is Klytämnestra herself who must die and that she and her banished brother Orest will kill her (“Was bluten muss?”). Klytämnestra is horrified, but when her confidante runs in and whispers something, her mood changes abruptly. Laughing maniacally, she disappears into the palace. Her behavior is explained when Chrysothemis reappears with news that Orest is dead. Stunned, Elektra at first refuses to believe her, then tells her sister that she must now help kill Klytämnestra and Aegisth. Chrysothemis runs off in terror. As Elektra frantically starts digging for the buried axe that killed Agamemnon, a stranger appears. She asks him what he wants and he calmly replies that he has been sent to bring news of Orest’s death (“Was willst du, fremder Mensch?”). But when Elektra reveals that she is Agamemnon’s daughter, he tells her Orest lives. Suddenly servants appear, kissing his hands and feet. Frightened, Elektra asks who he is. The dogs in the courtyard know me, the stranger replies, but not my own sister? Crying his name, Elektra gives in to her unspeakable joy and declares she has lived only to avenge their father’s murder. When Orest’s guardian tells him the queen waits inside, the men enter the palace. Elektra waits anxiously and when a scream is heard she knows Orest has killed their mother. Aegisth arrives, having heard the news of Orest’s death, and Elektra lights his way into the palace with sarcastic courtesy. A moment later he reappears at a window, crying for help, before he is dragged inside and killed. While tumultuous confusion spreads through the palace and courtyard, Elektra, in a state of ecstasy, begins a triumphal dance. Chrysothemis returns but Elektra doesn’t hear her and at the climax of the dance falls dead.
4 months ago |
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JAMES COHN was born in 1928, in Newark, New Jersey. He attended the Juilliard School of Music in New York City graduating with two degrees in Composition. He is listed in Who’s Who in America and Who’s Who in World Jewry. He has written solo, chamber, choral and orchestral works, and his catalog includes 4 string quartets, 5 piano sonatas and 9 symphonies. Some have won awards, including a Queen Elisabeth of Belgium Prize. Jim, who will be celebrating his 90th birthday on February 12th, 2018, is still composing. His major commission in 2016 was for a Concerto for English Horn and String Orchestra for Pedro Diaz, Principal English Horn of the Metropolitan Opera Orchestra in New York. This work will be premiered in summer of 2018 in Costa Rica and will be repeated at the International Double Reed Society Convention in Granada Spain. Jim has received 9 new commissions in 2017. Dance Suite for Violin & Guitar by Romulo Benavides & David Galvez, A Clarinet Quartet for the Brownstone Quartet in New York by Don Payne, a Concerto for Violin and Orchestra by Amadi Azikiwe, the KAM Trio,(Clarinet, Piano and Cello), honoring Korean, American and Moldavian musicians – Sonna Kim, Joseph Rosen and Taisya Pushkar, a new work for the Claribel Clarinet Choir from Oostende, Belgium, a new work (3 Portraits) for the American Soprano, April Armstrong, for Voice and String Quartet, String Quartet #4 for the Johnson Quartet in Philadelphia, a new work for the Cante Libra Chamber Ensemble for Flute, Harp, Violin, Viola and Cello and a new work for Clarinet and Piano – Klezmer themes - for Caroline Hartig – President of the International Clarinet Association for a recording project in 2018. Jim’s 2nd Violin Concerto for Amadi Azikiwe (Afro-American Echoes) will be premiered in summer of 2018 in South Africa and he is currently working on the new Suite (Serenade) for the Cante Libra Music Ensemble. Jim’s music is available on the XLNT Music label, The Naxos American Classics label and the MSR Music Classics label.
4 months ago |
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Mass in C, K. 257 "Credo" Missa brevis in C, K. 258 "Spaur" Missa brevis in C, K. 259 "Organ Solo" Conducted by Dominique Beaulieu CMD Chorus and Philharmonic of Paris in Orlean Purchase now at ClassicalRecordings.co
4 months ago |
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SHADOW ETCHINGS NEW MUSIC FOR FLUTE Orlando Cela Orlando Cela demonstrates his ingenious ability to navigate complexities of postmodernism in chamber music and the avant garde with this rich recording of flute and piccolo treasures for the curious ear. Operating with a creative vision inspired by Frederic Chopin that "simplicity is the final achievement," Cela invites the listener on a journey of experimental music beginning with Besingrand's "Le soupir du roseau dans les bras du vent" in which the flutist explores the unexpected possibilities for creating sound with his instrument. Cela furthers the investigation with "Winter Variations," by Lou Bunk ("featuring John Cage"), investigating, too, the possible extremes in lower dynamics. In Robert Gross' "Variations on a Schenker Graph of Gesualdo," Cela challenges the listener to decipher what is real from what is imagined. Dana Kaufman's "Hang Down Your Head," is the most ethnographic work on the recording, alluding to an ambiguous folk setting. It could be Nebraska; it could be Mars. The minimalism in composition lets the listener decide as Cela's flawless delivery leads the way. Shadow Etchings is unapologetically unconventional yet simultaneously accessible to even the untrained ear. If you are looking to expand your horizons, this is the place to start. Purchase now at ClassicalRecordings.co
4 months ago |
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Ken and Sandy are celebrating their 43rd Wedding Anniversary in February 2018. Now you can receive a 43% discount off of your entire order at ClassicalRecordings.co in celebration of their anniversary. Just use the discount code "anniversary" at checkout.
4 months ago |
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Schumann: Symphony No. 1 in B-flat Major, Op. 38 "Spring Symphony" Tchaikovsky: Symphony No 1 in G minor, Op. 13 "Winter Dreams" Dominique Beaulieu, conductor CMD Paris Philharmonic in Orlean Purchase now at ClassicalRecordings.co
4 months ago |
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Haydn: Symphony No. 1 in D Major ?Mozart: Symphony No. 1 in E-flat, K. 16 ?Krommer: Symphony No 1 in F Major, Op. 12 Dominique Beaulieu, conductor ?CMD Philharmonic of Paris in Orlean Purchase now at ClassicalRecordings.co
4 months ago |
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Haydn: Symphony No. 1 in D Major ?Mozart: Symphony No. 1 in E-flat, K. 16 ?Krommer: Symphony No 1 in F Major, Op. 12 Dominique Beaulieu, conductor ?CMD Philharmonic of Paris in Orlean Purchase now at ClassicalRecordings.co
4 months ago |
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