Classical Music Buzz > Classical Music Discoveries
Classical Music Discoveries
Classical Music Discoveries
Proudly Sponsored by La Musica International Chamber Music Festival in Sarasota, Florida and the Southwest Symphony Orchestra in St. George, Utah
316 Episodes
Rachmaninoff's Evening Service Op. 37 is considered by many to be his greatest choral work. Sung completely A Cappella this work is the evening prayer service in the Russian Orthodox church...although...not the complete text. Rachmaninoff wrote Evening Service in 1916, when the future of Russia was about to become a prolonged, dehumanizing catastrophe through the Revolution in which Nicholas II and Alexandra were forcefully abdicated. But there is in the heart of all Russians, a depth of sorrowful love which receives catastrophe as a kind of revelation which Evening Service so eloquently captures in voice. This extremely rare, privately produced recording captures this work as it was performed by the Choir of the Papal Russian College.  The person or persons who made this recording is completely unknown. The year of this recording is also unknown. However, we believe this was recorded in the 1950's in Rome, Italy. You can own this extremely rare recording by clicking on the Purchase Here hyperlink below Bethany's photos at any time as you listen to this performance. This recording is available as either a digital download or on 3 CDs. Select format and shipping option Digital Download Only $5.99 USD 3 CDs and US Shipping $19.99 USD 3 CDs and International Shipping $29.99 USD
7 months ago | |
Tag
Welcome to La Musica Chamber Music Hour sponsored by La Musica International Chamber Music Festival in Sarasota Florida.   This month we will be pleased to hear their April 17, 2013 concert which includes the following master works: "Fairy Tales, Op. 132" one of the final works by Robert Schumann. "String Quartet, Op. 22" by Paul Hindemith "Quartet for Clarinet and Strings in B minor, Op. 115" by Johannes Brahms Performers for these works are: Ruth Lenz and Laura Zarina - violins Bruno Giuranna - viola Eric Kim and Julie Albers - cello Jose Franch-Ballester - clarinet Derek Han - piano We wish to thank Sally Faron, La Musica's Festival Director and everyone involved with the Festival for allowing us to broadcast this recording to our global audience. While listening to this concert, just click on the hyper-link below the pictures that says, "La Musica Website" to learn more about next season's concerts and activities starting in April 2014. Now we are very proud to bring to you this month's edition of "La Musica Chamber Music Hour. Become a Friend of Classical Music Discoveries!
8 months ago | |
Tag
Turandot is an opera in three acts by Giacomo Puccini, completed by Franco Alfano, set to a libretto in Italian by Giuseppe Adami and Renato Simoni. Though Puccini's first interest in the subject was based on his reading of Friedrich Schiller's adaptation of the play, his work is most nearly based on the earlier text Turandot by Carlo Gozzi. The original story is based on the epic Turan-Dokht from the book Haft-Peykar, work of 12th-century Persian poet Nizami. The opera's story is set in China and involves Prince Calàf, who falls in love with the cold Princess Turandot. To obtain permission to marry her, a suitor has to solve three riddles; any false answer results in death. Calàf passes the test, but Turandot still hesitates to marry him. He offers her a way out: he agrees to die should she be able to guess his real name. The opera was unfinished at the time of Puccini's death in 1924, and was completed by Franco Alfano in 1926. The first performance was held at the Teatro alla Scala in Milan on 25 April 1926 and conducted by Arturo Toscanini. This performance included only Puccini's music and not Alfano's additions. The first performance of the opera as completed by Alfano was the following night, 26 April, although it is disputed whether this was conducted by Toscanini again or by Ettore Panizza. Puccini's Turandot is sponsored, in part, by QR Radio. Order Turandot below. This recording is available by Digital Download or shipped to you on 3 CDs. Select format and shipping Digital Download $5.99 USD CDs w/ USA Shipping $19.99 USD CDs w/ International Shipping $29.99 USD
8 months ago | |
Tag
Many of our listeners will ask Ken what's on his playlist? Just a few years ago if you had asked that, people would be wondering, "What are you talking about?" My have the times changed with today's modern electronics and so has our vocabulary grown to reflect the advancement of today's modern high tech gadgets. So in answer to everyone's question, we present to you a broadcast made exclusively of Ken's 5-star classical playlist. Probably a great many numbers you will recognize, but maybe some are not too familiar to you. Don't worry, we'll list the name of each piece as it is being played. Also by clicking on the name of each piece, you will be take over to our CD store so you can order Ken's playlist for yourself as a digital download for only $1.99! So now we are pleased to bring to you - Ken's 5-star Playlist Order the music used for this broadcast below:
8 months ago | |
Tag
The Symphony No. 6 in A minor by Gustav Mahler, sometimes referred to as the Tragic, was composed between 1903 and 1904. The work's first performance was in Essen, Germany, on May 27, 1906, conducted by the composer. The tragical ending of No. 6 has been seen as unexpected, given that the symphony was composed at what was apparently an exceptionally happy time in Mahler's life: he had married Alma Schindler in 1902, and during the course of the work's composition his second daughter was born. The symphony is far from the most popular of Mahler's works. Statistics compiled by the League of American Orchestras show that over the seven seasons in the U.S. and Canada ending with 2008-2009, the symphony was programmed considerably less often than Symphonies Nos. 1, 2, 4, and 5. However, both Alban Berg and Anton Webern praised it when they first heard it: for Berg it was "the only sixth, despite the Pastoral"; while Webern actually conducted it on more than one occasion. We are sure you will find this recording by the CMD Philharmonic of Paris one of the best performances of this symphony. You can purchase a digital or CD recording of this symphony below: Choose format and shipping option Digital Download only $9.99 USD 2 CDs w/US Shipping $19.99 USD 2 CDs w/International Shipping $29.99 USD
8 months ago | |
Tag
The Symphony No. 6 in A minor by Gustav Mahler, sometimes referred to as the Tragic, was composed between 1903 and 1904. The work's first performance was in Essen, Germany, on May 27, 1906, conducted by the composer. The tragical ending of No. 6 has been seen as unexpected, given that the symphony was composed at what was apparently an exceptionally happy time in Mahler's life: he had married Alma Schindler in 1902, and during the course of the work's composition his second daughter was born. The symphony is far from the most popular of Mahler's works. Statistics compiled by the League of American Orchestras show that over the seven seasons in the U.S. and Canada ending with 2008-2009, the symphony was programmed considerably less often than Symphonies Nos. 1, 2, 4, and 5. However, both Alban Berg and Anton Webern praised it when they first heard it: for Berg it was "the only sixth, despite the Pastoral"; while Webern actually conducted it on more than one occasion. We are sure you will find this recording by the CMD Philharmonic of Paris one of the best performances of this symphony. You can purchase a digital or CD recording of this symphony below: Choose format and shipping option Digital Download only $9.99 USD 2 CDs w/US Shipping $19.99 USD 2 CDs w/International Shipping $29.99 USD
8 months ago | |
Tag
Welcome to another edition of the Southwest Symphony Hour. In this month's broadcast we're going to give you a little challenge just to see how well you listen to the source music in today's movies. Classical music has been used in movies, well, ever since the days of silent films. Classical music and movies have worked hand-in-hand for many decades. However, many people believe that classical music isn't used in today's movies, opting for the more popular pop and rock music. However, if you listen carefully, you will still find a lot of classical music in today's big block buster hits and also the lesser known independent films So for this broadcast, we are going to play about 90 minutes of classical music from today's films. Instead of showing the title of each piece, we're going to show which movie the music was used in. Your job will be to listen to the music and see if you can guess correctly which movie it was used in. Remember...no fair peeking! We also want to remind you that season tickets are now on sale for the 2013/2014 season of the Southwest Symphony Orchestra in St. George, Utah. To visit their website, please go to www. SouthwestSymphony.co or just click on the name of the movie as each piece is being played on our show. The hyperlink will take you directly to their website as you continue listening to our show. So, just sit back and enjoy this month's edition of the Southwest Symphony Hour as we feature Movie Music! Purchase Southwest Symphony recordings at: www.SWSORecordings.com
8 months ago | |
Tag
In this month's 11th edition of Play My Music we have quite a broad selection of music for you. We will hear from listener favorites Alexandre Brussilovsky, Lara Downes and Monica Chapman. We will also hear some selections from new musicians to our show: Refat Homsi a composer from Saudi Arabia, cellist Samuel Magill from the United States and Maylin Svensson a composer from Denmark. Please click the donate below to help support Classical Music Discoveries and our mission to bring beautiful classical music to the entire world. Your kind donation of ANY amount is welcome.
8 months ago | |
Tag
In this month's Lost Recording we present to you a 1953 recording of William Steinburg conducting the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra. Maestro Steinburg had only been with the symphony for a year when he recorded Richard Strauss' Till Eulenspiegel's Merry Pranks, Op. 28 and Death and Transfiguration, Op. 24. These recordings never saw the light of day with any recording studio and are not listed on any discography of Maestro Steinburg's. These magnificent works display the exceptional talents of a young William Steinburg and his superb skills at controlling an orchestra to produce the exact sound he wants. To this day, these 2 lost performances are the finest renditions of these works ever recorded. This holds exceptionally true pertaining to Death and Transfiguration where this work is rarely recorded. On this broadcast, you will hear the finest performance of this work ever recorded. Order this CD or Digital Download below: Select Format and Shipping Digital Download $2.99 USD CD w/USA Shipping $12.99 USD CD w/International Shipping $22.99 USD
8 months ago | |
Tag
In this month's Lost Recording we present to you a 1953 recording of William Steinburg conducting the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra. Maestro Steinburg had only been with the symphony for a year when he recorded Richard Strauss' Till Eulenspiegel's Merry Pranks, Op. 28 and Death and Transfiguration, Op. 24. These recordings never saw the light of day with any recording studio and are not listed on any discography of Maestro Steinburg's. These magnificent works display the exceptional talents of a young William Steinburg and his superb skills at controlling an orchestra to produce the exact sound he wants. To this day, these 2 lost performances are the finest renditions of these works ever recorded. This holds exceptionally true pertaining to Death and Transfiguration where this work is rarely recorded.  On this broadcast, you will hear the finest performance of this work ever recorded. Order this Lost Recording from 1953 below: Select Format and Shipping Digital Download $2.99 USD CD w/USA Shipping $12.99 USD CD w/International Shipping $22.99 USD
8 months ago | |
Tag
61 - 70  | prev 34567891011 next
InstantEncore