Classical Music Buzz > The Concert
The Concert
Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum
Classical Music Podcasts from the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum
314 Episodes

Works for solo piano by Griffes performed by Richard Masters on September 20, 2015 and Paavali Jumppanen on November 29, 2015.

  • Griffes: Roman Sketches, Op. 7: The White peacock
  • Debussy: 12 Preludes, Book 1

The gently unfurling plumage of a white peacock. A barren winter landscape dinted with footprints. This podcast is all about using music to evoke and communicate impressions.

The bulk of the program is made up of Debussy’s 12 Preludes, from Book 1. A series of brief works meant to evoke a particular atmosphere or landscape, the Preludes are among Debussy’s most important achievements, each a small masterpiece unto itself. The 12 movements in book 1 evoke everything from dancers to sails to the languorous sounds and scents of the evening. We’ll hear the preludes performed by pianist Paavali Jumppanen.

Before the Debussy, we’ll hear an impressionistic work from the other side of the pond: Charles Griffes’ “The White Peacock,” the first movement of his Roman Sketches, opus 7. “The White Peacock” is perhaps his best-known work; originally written for piano, it was also published in an arrangement for orchestra. Tragically, the composer died just a year later. It’s hard not to wonder how Griffes and his work might have developed and impacted American composition, had he survived. We’ll hear “The White Peacock” performed by pianist Richard Masters.

5 months ago | |
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Work by Handel performed by A Far Cry with Amanda Forsythe, soprano on November 16, 2014 and work by Beethoven performed by Borromeo String Quartet on October 24, 2010.

  • Handel: Armida abbandonata, HWV 105
  • Beethoven: Quartet No. 11 in F minor, Op. 95
Armida abbandonata, a setting of the famous Italian story, detailing the grief of the sorceress Armida at being abandoned by her lover Rinaldo, a waylaid soldier. In the final aria, she prays to the god of love to pity her, and help her forget her former lover. We’ll hear the piece sung by soprano Amanda Forsythe, with the chamber orchestra A Far Cry.

Then we move to Beethoven’s String Quartet No. 11 in F minor, often referred to as the “Serioso” quartet—the composer’s own subtitle. The piece sounds troubled from the start, ferocious and full of intensity, with jagged themes and plenty of dissonance. It continues that way for most of its length, until the storm clouds unexpectedly part at the very end, and a ray of hope shines through in the last few minutes of the finale.

We begin with Amanda Forsythe, singing Handel’s cantata Armida abbandonata.

5 months ago | |
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Works by Bach for chamber orchestra performed by Rebel on November 10, 2013 and solo piano performed by Ji, piano on April 12, 2015.

  • Bach: Concerto in A Major
  • Bach: Toccata, Adagio, and Fuge BWV 564 arr. Ferrucio Busoni

It’s incredible to think just how much influence and resonance the music of Johann Sebastian Bach still has today, three hundred years after it was written. This podcast shows just two of the many examples of ways in which musicians continue to discover new possibilities in this centuries-old music, recreating Bach for different times and instruments.

The concerto on this podcast was originally composed for oboe d’amore, and only later adapted and published for harpsichord as the Concerto in A Major, BWV 1055. Centuries later, however, only the harpsichord version remained. So in the 1970s, scholar and editor Wilfried Fischer decided to tackle the task of recreating the original oboe concerto, based on an early manuscript that provided hints about which lines were originally meant for oboe.

Perhaps the most radical advance in musical technology since the Baroque era has been in the keyboard family, and Bach’s music is now regularly played on piano—an instrument that did not exist during his lifetime. Following the oboe concerto, we’ll hear Bach’s Toccata, Adagio and Fugue in C major for organ, adapted for the modern piano by Ferruccio Busoni. We’ll hear the piece performed by the young Chinese-born pianist Ji.

6 months ago | |
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Works for piano by Schumann performed by Paavali Jumppanen on May 4, 2014 and November 30, 2014.

This podcast comes courtesy of several musical personas. Not just Schumann, the composer of both the works, but also his alter egos – Florestan and Eusebius – the characters he used to personify different aspects of his artistic disposition. It was under these names, not his own, that Schumann published his first piano sonata—the “Grosse Sonate” in F-sharp minor, opus 11.

Before the sonata, we’ll hear a shorter showstopper, also by Schumann: Variations on “Abegg,” Schumann’s opus 1, the first piece he ever published. The dedication is to another of Schumann’s fictional friends—the countess Pauline of Abegg, a character likely inspired by Schumann’s childhood friend Meta von Abegg. The piece takes its namesake quite literally, building on a theme using the notes A-B-flat-E-G-G—spelling out the name “Abegg” in the notes. Those five notes are a starting point for a series of variations that are alternately dazzling and lyrical.

Both pieces were performed at the Gardner by pianist Paavali Jumppanen. We begin with the Abegg Variations.

6 months ago | |
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Works for strings by Brahms performed by A Far Cry on December 9, 2012 and Musicians from Marlboro on May 10, 2015.

Imagine if, before you published your first string quartet, you wrote and discarded twenty others? As the All Music Guide notes, in his entire compositional life, Brahms produced just three string quartets to Haydn’s 68, Mozart’s 23, and Beethoven’s 16. This is all the more striking if one considers Brahms’ relatively long lifespan of 63 years compared to, say, Mozart, who died at age 35.

We’ll hear Brahms’s first published quartet on our podcast today, the String Quartet No. 1 in C minor, in a performance by Musicians from Marlboro. It’s not hard to hear what made this piece so challenging to write. Brahms creates a quartet that is very tightly structured, with themes that recur throughout the length of the work, not just within the individual movements, and a carefully constructed harmonic architecture.

Before we dive into the quartet, though, we begin with a piece that shows Brahms’s lighter side: an orchestral version of his Hungarian Rhapsody, arranged for the chamber orchestra A Far Cry by their cellist Alastair Eng.

7 months ago | |
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Works for strings by Brahms performed by A Far Cry on December 9, 2012 and Musicians from Marlboro on May 10, 2015.

Imagine if, before you published your first string quartet, you wrote and discarded twenty others? As the All Music Guide notes, in his entire compositional life, Brahms produced just three string quartets to Haydn’s 68, Mozart’s 23, and Beethoven’s 16. This is all the more striking if one considers Brahms’ relatively long lifespan of 63 years compared to, say, Mozart, who died at age 35.

We’ll hear Brahms’s first published quartet on our podcast today, the String Quartet No. 1 in C minor, in a performance by Musicians from Marlboro. It’s not hard to hear what made this piece so challenging to write. Brahms creates a quartet that is very tightly structured, with themes that recur throughout the length of the work, not just within the individual movements, and a carefully constructed harmonic architecture.

Before we dive into the quartet, though, we begin with a piece that shows Brahms’s lighter side: an orchestral version of his Hungarian Rhapsody, arranged for the chamber orchestra A Far Cry by their cellist Alastair Eng.

7 months ago | |
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Work for string quartet by Boccherini performed by Musicians from Ravinia's Steans Institute on May 3, 2015 and work for solo piano by Bach performed by Jean-Frédéric Neuburger on April 2, 2008.

What is the single most famous piece of chamber music from the Baroque era?

It’s hard to argue that the prize goes to the first work on this podcast, Boccherini’s String Quintet in E Major, Op. 11, No. 5, particularly the third-movement minuet. With its flirtatious turns and lilting, syncopated arpeggios, you will recognize the tune the moment it begins. The quintet comes to a close with a rondo that gives each player a moment in the sun. We’ll hear it all performed by musicians from the Ravinia Festival’s Steans Music Institute.

Then, we have an arguably more famous composer, with an arguably less famous piece: Bach’s Italian Concerto in F Major, played on piano by Jean-Frédéric Neuburger. This piece is curious animal: a concerto for solo piano, without any orchestra or other ensemble. In a way, it is a concerto for a pianist and himself—at times, the music conjures the heft of a full ensemble, with richly voiced chords, while at others it clearly takes a more soloistic tack, with elaborate counterpoint.

7 months ago | |
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Works for string orchestra and voice by Meder and Vivaldi performed by A Far Cry and Amanda Forsythe, soprano on November 16, 2014.

  • Meder: Sonata di Battaglia from Die bestandige Argenia
  • Vivaldi: Sonata a tre "La Folia" Op. 1 No. 12
  • Vivaldi: Nulla in mundo pax sincerta, RV 630

On this podcast, we feature three pieces from A Far Cry’s recent program of Baroque works, titled “Obsession.” Each of the works is bursting with relentless passion, though it is directed at very different subjects, for very different reasons.

In the first piece, Johann Meder’s Sonata di Battaglia, that alternates between aggressive, military-like marches and tender, reflective passages, perhaps depicting the characters’ mixed emotions at setting off for the battlefield.

Next comes Vivaldi’s variations on the famous Spanish theme “La Folia,” a tune that was a common test of a composer’s mettle. The piece gets wilder as it progresses, demanding ever more virtuosic playing from the featured violinists.

We close out the podcast with a piece featuring A Far Cry’s special guest for this concert, soprano Amanda Forsythe, in another Vivaldi work—his motet Nulla in mundo pax sincera. An ode to the bliss of heaven, the piece scorns the pains and empty pleasures of earth. Forsythe tackles the dazzling vocal passagework with delicious enthusiasm, and A Far Cry is with her every step of the way.

8 months ago | |
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Works for string orchestra and voice by Meder and Vivaldi performed by A Far Cry and Amanda Forsythe, soprano on November 16, 2014.

  • Meder: Sonata di Battaglia from Die bestandige Argenia
  • Vivaldi: Sonata a tre "La Folia" Op. 1 No. 12
  • Vivaldi: Nulla in mundo pax sincerta, RV 630

On this podcast, we feature three pieces from A Far Cry’s recent program of Baroque works, titled “Obsession.” Each of the works is bursting with relentless passion, though it is directed at very different subjects, for very different reasons.

In the first piece, Johann Meder’s Sonata di Battaglia, that alternates between aggressive, military-like marches and tender, reflective passages, perhaps depicting the characters’ mixed emotions at setting off for the battlefield.

Next comes Vivaldi’s variations on the famous Spanish theme “La Folia,” a tune that was a common test of a composer’s mettle. The piece gets wilder as it progresses, demanding ever more virtuosic playing from the featured violinists.

We close out the podcast with a piece featuring A Far Cry’s special guest for this concert, soprano Amanda Forsythe, in another Vivaldi work—his motet Nulla in mundo pax sincera. An ode to the bliss of heaven, the piece scorns the pains and empty pleasures of earth. Forsythe tackles the dazzling vocal passagework with delicious enthusiasm, and A Far Cry is with her every step of the way.

8 months ago | |
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Work for piano trio by Schubert performed by Claremont Trio on April 26, 2015.

Some works call for their own podcast. We have just such a piece on this program: Schubert’s Piano Trio No. 2, opus 100. We’ll hear it performed by the Claremont Trio: violinist Emily Bruskin, cellist Julia Bruskin, and pianist Donna Kwong.

The second movement features a minor tune that—thanks to Schubert—has become fairly well known. The use of this folk tune was supposedly inspired by the composer’s encounter with a Swedish folk singer shortly before he wrote the piece. If you listen carefully, you’ll notice that the theme returns. In the final movement, it makes a second appearance, this time a bit altered to fit its new surroundings, but still recognizable. It gives the expansive piece a sense of coherence and familiarity, a feel of musical déjà vu: I’ve been here before, one can’t help but think, although things look very different the second time around.

Unlike many of his other late works, Schubert actually had the opportunity to hear this trio played before he passed away. It was performed at an engagement party for a school friend of Schubert’s.

8 months ago | |
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